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ELECTRONIC LITHOGRAPHY

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026355D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Aug-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 79K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

A lithographic master may be generated electronically by changing imagewise the ink wettability of a lithographic substrate with electric means. In one embodiment, the lithographic substrate of a base material is accepting (is wetted by) lithographic inks. A thin coating is deposited on the surface of the substrate, the coating having the characteristic of rejecting the inks, i.e. it is non-wettable by these inks. An example of the ink accepting substrate is aluminum sheet, web or drum of the kind used for lithographic application. Examples of ink rejecting coating are fluoropolymers, waxes, and others. Examples of the fluoropolymers are Fluorad 721, Fluorad 725, and FC-10, all marketed by 3M Company.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

ELECTRONIC LITHOGRAPHY Proposed Classification Ivan Rezanka U.S. C1.101/463

Int. C1. B41M 5/00

A lithographic master may be generated electronically by changing imagewise the ink wettability of a lithographic substrate with electric means.

In one embodiment, the lithographic substrate of a base material is accepting (is wetted by) lithographic inks. A thin coating is deposited on the surface of the substrate, the coating having the characteristic of rejecting the inks, i.e. it is non-wettable by these inks. An example of the ink accepting substrate is aluminum sheet, web or drum of the kind used for lithographic application. Examples of ink rejecting coating are fluoropolymers, waxes, and others. Examples of the fluoropolymers are Fluorad 721, Fluorad 725, and FC-10, all marketed by 3M Company.

The ink rejecting coating is removed image wise from the surface of the substrate by locally directing charged ionic and/or subatomic species onto the substrate, thus exposing the original surface. The charged species are generated by corona discharge established by a multitude of switched electrodes, placed in close proximity of the substrate, or alternatively by a stream of ions extracted from a remote corona. The stream of ions is switched either at the source or by electric gates placed between the corona and the substrate.

The subsequent inking (image development) of the master and transfer of image to receiver sheet are done according to the...