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BUBBLE TRAP FOR INHIBITION OF CROSSTALK AND ENHANCEMENT OF REFILL FOR THERMAL INK JET PRINTHEADS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026361D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Aug-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-05
Document File: 6 page(s) / 267K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

A roofshooter thermal ink jet architecture 10 is depicted in Figure 1, with the nozzle plate 12 and nozzles 18 therein shown in dashed line. In this architecture, crosstalk between adjacent heaters 14 can be a problem. One way to solve the problem is to increase the length of the partitioning walls 16 to further isolate each heater. However, this increases the resistance to fluid refill after drop ejection, lowering the maximum operating frequency.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

BUBBLE TRAP FOR INHIBITION OF CROSSTALK AND U.S. C1.346/140R ENHANCEMENT OF REFILL FOR
THERMAL INK JET PRINTHEADS
Donald J. Drake

Proposed Classification Int. C1. GOlD 15/18

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 16, No. 4 July/August 1991 221

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

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BUBBLE TRAP FOR INHIBITION OF CROSSTALK AND ENHANCEMENT OF REFILL FOR THERMAL INK JET PRINTHEADS Cont'd.

222 XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 16, No. 4 July/August 1991

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 3 of 6

BUBBLE TRAP FOR INHIBITION OF CROSSTALK AND ENHANCEMENT OF REFILL FOR THERMAL INK JET PRINTHEADS Cont'd.

34 36

FIG. 3

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 16, No. 4 July/August 1991 223

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

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BUBBLE TRAP FOR INHIBITION OF CROSSTALK AND ENHANCEMENT OF REFILL FOR THERMAL INK JET PRINTHEADS(C0nt'd)

A roofshooter thermal ink jet architecture 10 is depicted in Figure 1, with the nozzle plate 12 and nozzles 18 therein shown in dashed line. In this architecture, crosstalk between adjacent heaters 14 can be a problem. One way to solve the problem is to increase the length of the partitioning walls 16 to further isolate each heater. However, this increases the resistance to fluid refill after drop ejection, lowering the maximum operating frequency.

Another solution, used in one commercial printhead (not shown) is to place a large open slot near the refill channels. The pressure pulse generated by the bubble then expends itself on displacing the meniscus from its equilibrium position. One attractive feature of this approach is that the displacement is an elastic phenomenon. The work put into displacing the meniscus is recovered during refill because surface tension forces on the meniscus draw it back to its equilibrium position. Hence, the apparently wasted work used in moving non- ejected ink is recovered during refill.

However, one problem with this approach is that the slot is an additional site for ink evaporation. This adds to an already serious problem and can require printhead capping as well as exotic maintenance procedures during printing. An architecture is, therefore, needed which provides a liquiagas interface for crosstalk damping/enhanced refill which is not a site for ink evaporation.

Figure 2 shows a modified roofshooter architecture 19. On one side of the array of heaters 14, a reservoir/fill hole slot 20 is etched from the back of the heater wafer 22. Refill occurs exclusively from this side (experimental observation). On the other side of the array of heaters, a compartment 24 is provided. This compartment can be filled...