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Browse Prior Art Database

METHOD OF OPERATION OF INK JET PRINTER

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026364D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Aug-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 71K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Reliable operation of an ink jet printer is necessary for its commercial success. The reliability of an ink jet printer has been found substantially improved, when the pressure in the inks in the printhead nozzles is kept within a pre-determined range of gauge pressures. This range of pressures is between + 0.5 and -10 inches of H20, preferably between 0.0 and -5 inches of H20. In a specific case, this improvement was achieved with a thermal ink jet printer by various means, including:

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

METHOD OF OPERATION OF INK JET PRINTER US. C1.346/14012 Dale R. Ims
Roger G. Markham
Stephen F. Pond
Ivan Rezanka
Paul J. Rowe

Proposed Classification

Int. C1. GOlD 15/16

Reliable operation of an ink jet printer is necessary for its commercial success.

The reliability of an ink jet printer has been found substantially improved, when the pressure in the inks in the printhead nozzles is kept within a pre- determined range of gauge pressures. This range of pressures is between + 0.5 and -10 inches of H20, preferably between 0.0 and -5 inches of H20. In a specific case, this improvement was achieved with a thermal ink jet printer by various means, including:

1. Gravitational effects, either by providing hydrostatic pressure of the ink column itself, the ink column open to atmosphere below the level of the ink nozzles, or by dead weight or weights.

2. Elastic energy of solid member mechanically communicating with ink. The solid member is a spring, internal or external to the ink, ink container or a part of ink container.

3. Surface tension of a meniscus of liquid, the meniscus being attached to a solid material. The liquid may optionally be advantageously the ink itself with the solid material being advantageously structured in fibrous or tubular fashion.

4. Volume of captive gas, preferably air, held under predetermined pressure in a container. The compressibility of air allows a substantial fraction of ink to be withdrawn from an enclosed co...