Browse Prior Art Database

CARBON DIOXIDE BLAST CLEANING

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026384D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Oct-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 99K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

A carbon dioxide blast cleaning process for cleaning used or disassembled xerographic and related machine parts and components is disclosed. The process comprises the steps of: expanding liquefied carbon dioxide at 200 to 300 pounds per square inch to form pea sized carbon dioxide pellets; fluidizing and pumping the carbon dioxide pellets at 35 to 40 pounds per square inch to a spray nozzle; exposing a toner impacted, toner soiled or oil/grease contaminated machine part to the nozzle directed spray of the pellets; removing waste dirt and dust particles liberated from the part by the carbon dioxide stream by a positive air flow and filter means; removing frozen oil and grease particles by entrapping with a wet vacuum system; and venting particulate free carbon dioxide gas to the atmosphere.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

CARBON DIOXIDE BLAST CLEANING
Catherine M. Genca
Bonnie J. McManus

Proposed Classification
U.S. C1.051/410 Int. C1. B24C 03/00

A carbon dioxide blast cleaning process for cleaning used or disassembled xerographic and related machine parts and components is disclosed. The process comprises the steps of: expanding liquefied carbon dioxide at 200 to 300 pounds per square inch to form pea sized carbon dioxide pellets; fluidizing and pumping the carbon dioxide pellets at 35 to 40 pounds per square inch to a spray nozzle; exposing a toner impacted, toner soiled or oil/grease contaminated machine part to the nozzle directed spray of the pellets; removing waste dirt and dust particles liberated from the part by the carbon dioxide stream by a positive air flow and filter means; removing frozen oil and grease particles by entrapping with a wet vacuum system; and venting particulate free carbon dioxide gas to the atmosphere.

The spray nozzle consists of a series of two truncated bushing adaptors that reduce a carbon dioxide feed line from about a one inch diameter to about less than a three eighths inch diameter copper tubing spray nozzle tip. The truncation of the nozzle induces Venturic effect turbulence which is believed to be responsible for the high level of cleaning efficiencies at reduced pressures.

The frozen oil or grease particulates are captured by the wet vacuum before they reach the floor of the spray booth or are able to contaminate other areas or parts.

Advantages of this process over existing process equipment include: l...