Browse Prior Art Database

SAMPLE PREPARATION JIG FOR SAMPLE MICROSCOPY

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026385D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Oct-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-05
Document File: 6 page(s) / 286K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

The present invention relates to electron microscopy, in particular, an apparatus for preparation of samples to be viewed in an electron microscope. A transmission electron microscope is capable of capturing details of a portion of a sample at the atomic level. In order to do so, however, the region of the sample to be viewed must be on the order of 100 or less in thickness. The sample to be viewed is often in the form of a disk of material which must be appropriately thinned. One common technique for thinning a sample is to place it on a holder and grind it down to the appropriate thickness. A refinement on this technique is to grind it down to a sufficient thickness, then put the sample in an ion mill and actually perforate the sample at one point. The regions of the sample at the immediate circumference of the perforation are of the appropriate thickness for electron microscopy.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

SAMPLE PREPARATION JIG FOR Proposed Classification SAMPLE MICROSCOPY U.S. C1.250/440.1 Joseph C. Tramontana Int. C1. Golf 23/00

Fig. la

(Prior Art)

Fig. lb

(Prior Art)

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 16, No. 5 September/October 1991 275

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

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SAMPLE PREPARATION JIG FOR SAMPLE MICROSCOPY(Cont'd)

34 40' I

<32

0.25mm

-46

I

Fig. 2A

Fig. 2B

276 XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 16, No. 5 SeptembedOctober 1991

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 3 of 6

SAMPLE PREPARATION JIG FOR SAMPLE MICROSCOPY(Cont'd)

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 16, No. 5 SeptembedOctober 1991 277

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 4 of 6

SAMPLE PREPARATION JIG FOR SAMPLE MICROSCOPY(Cont'd)

The present invention relates to electron microscopy, in particular, an apparatus for preparation of samples to be viewed in an electron microscope. A transmission electron microscope is capable of capturing details of a portion of a sample at the atomic level. In order to do so, however, the region of the sample to be viewed must be on the order of 100 or less in thickness. The sample to be viewed is often in the form of a disk of material which must be appropriately thinned. One common technique for thinning a sample is to place it on a holder and grind it down to the appropriate thickness. A refinement on this technique is to grind it down to a sufficient thickness, then put the sample in an ion mill and actually perforate the sample at one point. The regions of the sample at the immediate circumference of the perforation are of the appropriate thickness for electron microscopy.

In order to facilitate the thinning of the sample, the sample must be held in an appropriate holder, or jig, and placed in a grinding apparatus for grinding to the appropriate thickness. Such a jig of the type known in the art is shown in Figs. 1A and lB, and the jig employed in an apparatus for grinding the sample to an appropriate thickness is shown in Fig. 1C. According to Fig. lA, the prior art jig 10 included a body section 12 and in a grinding solution retaining section 14. Body section 12 is formed to define a cylindrical mesa 16 upon which a sample 18 may be placed. Retaining section 14 has defined therein a first opening for receiving the cylindrical mesa 16. Retaining section 14 has defined therein a second opening 22 for receiving grinding compound and/or polishing solution (not shown). Body section 12 has defined therein a mounting shaft receiving region 24 and threaded opening 26 for receiving a set screw 28 to attach the entire assembly to the shaft in an appropriate grinding apparatus (not shown).

Grinding and polishing of the sample will be explained with regard to Fig. 1C. Initially, sample 18 will be secured to cylindrical mesa 16 by wax material as known in the art. Grinding solution retaining section 14 will then be placed on body section 12 and...