Browse Prior Art Database

MAGNETIC INDUCED POLEPIECE BRUSH CLEANER

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026424D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 110K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

One approach to cleaning toner from a photoreceptor in a xerographic process is to use a rotating fiber brush which is continuously detoned by one or more flicker bars and an air flow system. The brush fibers may be made of conducting or insulating materials and in the first case also electrically biased to assist in the cleaning and detoning.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

MAGNETIC INDUCED POLEPIECE Proposed Classification BRUSH CLEANER US. C1.355/305 William L. Goffe Int. C1. G03g 21/00

Al R

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol16 No 6 November/December 1991 371

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MAGNETIC INDUCED POLEPIECE BRUSH CLEANER(Cont'd)

One approach to cleaning toner from a photoreceptor in a xerographic process is to use a rotating fiber brush which is continuously detoned by one or more flicker bars and an air flow system. The brush fibers may be made of conducting or insulating materials and in the first case also electrically biased to assist in the cleaning and detoning.

For example, laid-open Japanese Patent No. 57-134709(A) (Appl. No. 55-
85861), describes a magnetic cleaning device which uses a rotating drum having a paddle wheel array of thin magnetic vanes which upon entering a magnetic field produce a high magnetic field gradient at their tips. These vanes, otherwise known as magnetic induced pole pieces, are then swept past the moving photoreceptor surface attracting and thereby cleaning magnetic toner particles off of it. The tips of these induced pole pieces laden with toner subsequently exit the magnetic field, lose their magnetic field gradients and are then easily detoned such as by a brush system. This arrangement is similar to that used in the magnetic separation industry to collect magnetic particles because it provides the high magnetic forces necessary. However to provide strong enough forces for xerographic cleaning it is necessa...