Browse Prior Art Database

VARIABLE PHOTORECEPTOR PARKING AFTER IMAGING

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026439D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Feb-29
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 72K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

In a xerographic copying machine, various machine components, such as radiant fusers, can adversely affect those portions of the photoreceptor that remain in close proximity to the components for extended periods of time. The extended time periods generally occur during machine warmup or standby states, when the photoreceptor is in a stationary or parked condition. Exposure to heat from a nearby fuser module can cause physical deformation of a photoreceptor, as well as, a degradation in the electrical properties of the photoconductive surface.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

VARIABLE PHOTORECEPTOR Proposed Classification PARKING AFTER IMAGING U.S. C1.355/204 John M. Magde Jr. Int. C1. G03g 21/00

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PARKING POSITION

In a xerographic copying machine, various machine components, such as radiant fusers, can adversely affect those portions of the photoreceptor that remain in close proximity to the components for extended periods of time. The extended time periods generally occur during machine warmup or standby states, when the photoreceptor is in a stationary or parked condition. Exposure to heat from a nearby fuser module can cause physical deformation of a photoreceptor, as well as, a degradation in the electrical properties of the photoconductive surface.

In order to reduce the impact of the aforementioned adverse components, the present invention spreads the adversely exposed area over a wide portion of the photoreceptor's circumferential surface. As illustrated in the figure, the photoreceptor is most frequently parked at a range of positions 10, centered about a nominal park position 12. Outside of high frequency area 10, the frequency of parking at each position is gradually reduced or tapered, areas 14 and 16, in order to eiiminate any abrupt distinction between the heat affected areas and the unaffected areas. Variation of the parking position in this manner does not eliminate adverse affects to the photoreceptor, but rather, spreads out the affected area so as...