Browse Prior Art Database

LAMINATION OF WELDED PHOTORECEPTOR BELT SEAMS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026458D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Feb-29
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-05
Document File: 4 page(s) / 205K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

A technique is disclosed for eliminating the delamination of welded flexible photoreceptor belt seams and for making the seams conductive to prevent waste of toner due to an inability to discharge the seams. More specifically, this technique pertains to the laminating of an extremely thin metal foil tape, such as copper, on top of the seam for the purpose of sealing and smoothing the seam area.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

LAMINATION OF WELDED Proposed Classification PHOTORECEPTOR BELT SEAMS U.S. C1.430/127
John J. Darcy
Karl V. Thomsen
Eugene A. Swain

Int. C1. G03g 5/00

'2 J"

10

14 FIG. 1

(- 28

(0)

I 22

I

1 1 FIG. 2

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 17, No. 1 Januaryzebruary 1992 47

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LAMINATION OF WELDED PHOTORECEPTOR BELT SEAMS

(Cont'd)

A technique is disclosed for eliminating the delamination of welded flexible photoreceptor belt seams and for making the seams conductive to prevent waste of toner due to an inability to discharge the seams. More specifically, this technique pertains to the laminating of an extremely thin metal foil tape, such as copper, on top of the seam for the purpose of sealing and smoothing the seam area.

One popular photoreceptor belt currently utilizes an ultrasonically welded seam. This seam is weakened and can delaminate when stressed by repeated collisions with a cleaning blade such as a doctor blade. The seam also causes paper fiber to be trapped under the doctor blades. It is thought that due to the roughness of the seam, the response time of the doctor blade is not fast enough to conform to each hill and valley of the seam. This provides an opportunity for the paper fibers to be trapped under the blade. The laminate can also smooth out the rough areas of the seam and eliminate the likelihood of fibers being trapped.

As illustrated in Fig. 1, thin metal foil tape 10, prior to application to the photoreceptor seam, is supported on one side by a suitable removable flexible backing 12, e.g. a 0.001 mil thick polyethylene terephthalate film, and coated on the other side with a suitable heat activatable adhesive layer 14 to form a laminate 16.

The heat activatable adhesive layer 14 of laminate 16 is applied to the photoreceptor belt seam (not shown) using heat and pressure. The heat necessary to activate the adhesive would be less than the Tg of the flexible backing 12. After application, the flexible backing 12 is removed, leaving only the copper foil metal foil tape 10 and adhesive layer 14 laminated to the seam. The resulting laminated seam should be quite thin and have a very high shear strength to withstand the rigorous environment of copiers, duplicators and printers, particularly those that utilize a doctor blade cleaning system. The inherent forces exerted by a cleaning blade riding over the foil laminate area are significantly less damaging than a cleaning blade riding over an unprotected seam.

A temporary, removable flexible backing layer for the foil is necessary to achieve the thinness required and to simplify production implementation. Without such a backing, the fragile foil would require highly complex and sophisticated equipment to pick up the leading edge of the foil and carry it across the width of the seam and subsequently lay it down on the seam without damaging the foil during handling. With a removable flexible ba...