Browse Prior Art Database

FAULT STATUS DISPLAY WITHIN A USER-INTERFACE ICON

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026474D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Apr-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-05
Document File: 2 page(s) / 142K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

On CRT or touchscreen type user-interfaces for copiers and similar pieces of ofice equipment, there may be an advantage to providing visual feedback to an operator to indicate the status of certain features within the system. While more advanced machines will generally mask faults or other problems during continued operation with a limited set of reprographic features, frequently, the operator is unaware of any faults or problems until he or she attempts to select a feature that is unavailable. As an example, consider a reprographic machine having two or more paper trays. An operator who is using paper from a first tray is generally not concerned about the level of paper in the second tray until it becomes time to use tray 2. Unfortunately, the status of tray 2 is not generally displayed or made known to the operator. Thus, the operator may loose precious operating time by waiting until tray 2 needs to be used, to recognize that it needs to be filled with paper, has a jammed sheet, or is not ready for some other reason.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 63% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

FAULT STATUS DISPLAY WITHIN A USER-INTERFACE ICON U.S. C1.355/202 Khalid M. Rabb

Proposed Classification Int. C1. G03G 21/00

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - VoI. 17, No. 2 MarcWAprill992 89

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 2 of 2

FAULT STATUS DISPLAY WITHIN A USER-INTERFACE IC 0 N( Cont Id)

On CRT or touchscreen type user-interfaces for copiers and similar pieces of ofice equipment, there may be an advantage to providing visual feedback to an operator to indicate the status of certain features within the system. While more advanced machines will generally mask faults or other problems during continued operation with a limited set of reprographic features, frequently, the operator is unaware of any faults or problems until he or she attempts to select a feature that is unavailable. As an example, consider a reprographic machine having two or more paper trays. An operator who is using paper from a first tray is generally not concerned about the level of paper in the second tray until it becomes time to use tray 2. Unfortunately, the status of tray 2 is not generally displayed or made known to the operator. Thus, the operator may loose precious operating time by waiting until tray 2 needs to be used, to recognize that it needs to be filled with paper, has a jammed sheet, or is not ready for some other reason.

Accordingly, the present invention is directed at an improved method for displaying the status of various featu...