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AUTOMATED NEAR INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY USING A FIBER OPTIC PROBE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026497D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jun-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

An automated near infrared spectroscopy system for the analysis of color toners and related materials such as ink jet inks is disclosed. The system relies upon an interactive fiber optic probe that is simply immersed into a sample container vessel before an infrared scan is performed. If a repeat determination is desired for toner materials, the probe is removed from the sample, the sample vessel is shaken and the probe is reinserted. For liquid inks, a series of rinsing baths are used between each sample determination. The system may be easily automated and suitable for robotic adaptation and manipulation. Experimental data may be recorded and logged for later review by an analyst. The system eliminates the need for analyst/operator intervention and allows a larger number of samples and analyses to be performed in a shorter period of time.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

AUTOMATED NEAR INFRARED Proposed Classification SPECTROSCOPY USING A FIBER
OPTIC PROBE
Tracy L. Johnston
Timothy L. Lincoln
Amrutial B. Pate1
David J. Fraser

U.S. C1.355/260 Int. C1. G03g 15/06

An automated near infrared spectroscopy system for the analysis of color toners and related materials such as ink jet inks is disclosed. The system relies upon an interactive fiber optic probe that is simply immersed into a sample container vessel before an infrared scan is performed. If a repeat determination is desired for toner materials, the probe is removed from the sample, the sample vessel is shaken and the probe is reinserted. For liquid inks, a series of rinsing baths are used between each sample determination. The system may be easily automated and suitable for robotic adaptation and manipulation. Experimental data may be recorded and logged for later review by an analyst. The system eliminates the need for analyst/operator intervention and allows a larger number of samples and analyses to be performed in a shorter period of time.

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 17, No. 3 May/June 1992 151

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152 XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 17, No. 3 May/June 1992

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