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EDGE EFFECT COMPENSATION IN HIGH FREQUENCY VIBRATORY ENERGY PRODUCING DEVICES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026573D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Oct-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-06
Document File: 6 page(s) / 282K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

In electrophotographic applications such as xerography, a charge retentive surface is electrostatically charged and exposed to a light pattern of an original image to be reproduced to selectively discharge the surface in accordance therewith. The resulting electrostatic latent image is developed by contacting it with toner. Thus, a toner image is produced and may then be transferred to a substrate (e.g., paper), and the image may then be affixed thereto. Subsequent to development, excess toner left on the charge retentive surface is cleaned from the surface. In a slightly different arrangement, toner may be transferred to an intermediate surface, prior to retransfer to a final substrate.

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Page 1 of 6

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

EDGE EFFECT COMPENSATION IN HIGH FREQUENCY VIBRATORY U.S. C1.355/274 ENERGY PRODUCING DEVICES
William
J. Nowak

Proposed Classification

Int. C1. G03G 15/14

FIG. I

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vo1.17 No. 5 September/October 1992 357

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Page 2 of 6

EDGE EFFECT COMPENSATION IN HIGH FREQUENCY VIBRATORY ENERGY PRODUCING DEVICES(Cont'd)

10

FIG. 2

358 XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vo1.17 No. 5 September/October 1992

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Page 3 of 6

EDGE EFFECT COMPENSATION IN HIGH FREQUENCY VIBRATORY ENERGY PRODUCING DEVICES(Cont*d)

In electrophotographic applications such as xerography, a charge retentive surface is electrostatically charged and exposed to a light pattern of an original image to be reproduced to selectively discharge the surface in accordance therewith. The resulting electrostatic latent image is developed by contacting it with toner. Thus, a toner image is produced and may then be transferred to a substrate (e.g., paper), and the image may then be affixed thereto. Subsequent to development, excess toner left on the charge retentive surface is cleaned from the surface. In a slightly different arrangement, toner may be transferred to an intermediate surface, prior to retransfer to a final substrate.

Transfer of toner from the charge retentive surface to the final substrate is commonly accomplished electrostatically when the toner image is held on the charge retentive surface with electrostatic and mechanical forces. Unfortunately, the interface between the substrate and the charge retentive surface is not always optimal. Particularly with non-flat sheets, such as sheets that have already passed through a fixing operation, or sheets that are brought into imperfect contact with the charge retentive surface, as characterized by gaps where contact has failed. There is a tendency for toner not to transfer across these gaps, resulting in a copy quality defect referred to as a transfer deletion. In addressing the transfer deletion problem, acoustic vibration has been applied to assist the transfer process. Moreover, acoustic agitation or vibration of a surface is known to enhance toner release therefrom, as described by US. Patent No. 4,111,546 to Maret, U.S. Patent No. 4,684,242 to Schultz, U.S. Patent No. 4,007,982 to Stange, and U.S. Patent No. 4,121,947 to Hemphill.

Accordingly, the present disclosure provides for the enhancement of toner release from a surface at any of the processing stations by utilizing a resonator suitable for generating vibratory energy. With reference to Figure 1, wherein a portion of a reproduction machine is shown including at least portions of the transfer, 40, detack, 42, and precleaning, 94, elements thereof, the basic principle of enhanced toner release is illustrated. A relatively high frequency acoustic or ultrasonic resonator 100, driven by an A.C. source (not shown) operated at a frequ...