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PRESERVING DYE IMAGES WITH A WATERFAST COLORLESS PLUORESCENT MATERIAL

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026589D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Oct-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-06
Document File: 4 page(s) / 276K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Images of dye based inks on plain and coated papers usually have poorer waterfastness than that of pigment based inks. This is because the dyes used in the inks are water soluble while the pigments are not. Due to good water solubility of the dyes their images on papers can be redissolved by water unless they can strongly react with paper or a paper coating additive to reduce dye water solubility. Most dye images have waterfastness problems. Information created with a nonwaterfast dye ink can be easily lost or distorted by water exposure. This creates a serious archival problem and it is especially true for an important document. Ink jet technology utilizing dye based inks may have this kind of problem. One way to improve the waterfastness of a dye image is to modify chemical structure of a dye so that it will either have reduced water solubility or can react with paper or an additive. Another way to preserve dye images or dye printed information from water damage is to use a colorless waterfast material whose image can be recognized easily under certain viewing illumination or conditions. The colorless nature of the chemical additive does not interfere with the original color of a dye and can be used in any color dye ink. Materials capable of preserving nonwaterfast dye images are disclosed.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

PRESERVING DYE IMAGES WITH A WATERFAST COLORLESS U.S. C1.364/140 FLUORESCENT MATERIAL
John Wei-Ping Lin

Proposed Classification

Int. C1. Gold 15/16

Images of dye based inks on plain and coated papers usually have poorer waterfastness than that of pigment based inks. This is because the dyes used in the inks are water soluble while the pigments are not. Due to good water solubility of the dyes their images on papers can be redissolved by water unless they can strongly react with paper or a paper coating additive to reduce dye water solubility. Most dye images have waterfastness problems. Information created with a nonwaterfast dye ink can be easily lost or distorted by water exposure. This creates a serious archival problem and it is especially true for an important document. Ink jet technology utilizing dye based inks may have this kind of problem. One way to improve the waterfastness of a dye image is to modify chemical structure of a dye so that it will either have reduced water solubility or can react with paper or an additive. Another way to preserve dye images or dye printed information from water damage is to use a colorless waterfast material whose image can be recognized easily under certain viewing illumination or conditions. The colorless nature of the chemical additive does not interfere with the original color of a dye and can be used in any color dye ink. Materials capable of preserving nonwaterfast dye images are disclosed.

To preserve ink jet color images, including cyan, blue, magenta, red, yellow, black and other colors, of a dye based ink from water damage a fluorescent material is used as an ink forumulation additive. A fluorescent material which can strongly attach or adhere to paper either by absorption or reaction is preferred.

The fluorescent material and a color dye material can be employed together (preferred) or separately in a recording liquid. A recording liquid containing fluorescent material and color dye($ forms coincident images on a substrate
(e.g. plain paper, treated pa er, etc.) to give both a fluorescent property and

waterfast then the color image will fade or be distorted upon exposure to water resulting in a loss of color information. However, the fluorescent material

with excellent waterfastness the image or information is preserved. The information can be readily retrieved by viewing a washed out or faded image under an ultraviolet light (UV).

color property through an in t jet printing method. If the color of the dye is not

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vo1.17 No. 5 SepternbedOctober 1992 403

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- PRESERVING DYE IMAGES WITH A WATERFAST COLORLESS FLU0 RE SCE NT MATE RIAL(Cont'd)

The fluorescent materials should have both water solubility and good waterfastness. These fluorescent materials are primarily derivatives of stilbene and coumarin which are employed in paper, textile and detergent industries for p...