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PHOTO ERASABLE IONOGRAPHIC RECEPTOR

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026590D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Oct-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 168K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

An advantage of ionography over xerography is its elimination of the need for a photoreceptor. In its place, a non light sensitive dielectric receptor of appropriate dielectric constant and thickness is used to retain a latent electrostatic image formed by controlled ion deposition onto its surface. Non light sensitive dielectric receptors, however, force an erase function to depend upon contact (typically via corona) with the top surface of the receptor. Internal polarization and/or trapped charge may result in failure of the erase function due to dielectric relaxation effects. This problem has been encountered in printers manifesting itself in the form of ghost image artifacts in prints.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

PHOTO ERASABLE IONOGRAPHIC RECEPTOR Christopher Snelling

Proposed Classification
U.S. C1.430/019 Int. C1. G03c 11/00

An advantage of ionography over xerography is its elimination of the need for a photoreceptor. In its place, a non light sensitive dielectric receptor of appropriate dielectric constant and thickness is used to retain a latent electrostatic image formed by controlled ion deposition onto its surface. Non light sensitive dielectric receptors, however, force an erase function to depend upon contact (typically via corona) with the top surface of the receptor. Internal polarization and/or trapped charge may result in failure of the erase function due to dielectric relaxation effects. This problem has been encountered in printers manifesting itself in the form of ghost image artifacts in prints.

In xerographic systems an erase function is achieved by photogeneration of copious amounts of charge carriers in the photoreceptor by erase light exposure. Although residual potential cycle up occurs in xerographic photoreceptors, magnitudes and rates of residual formation are typically much less than the dielectric relaxation potentials observed in some ionographic receptors.

Disclosed is an ionographic imaging member having a conductive layer and a dielectric imaging layer, wherein a latent image on an imaging device is erasable upon exposure to light. This photo-erasability is provided by introducing photosensitivity into the ionographic imaging member by incorporating a photosensitive material into the dielectric layer of the electro- receptor, preferably in an amount which does not substantially affect the electrographic properties of the electroreceptor. The electroreceptors are provided with a photosensitive material dispersed in an amount which is sufficient to provide photosensitivity to the electroreceptor necessary to obtain internal neutralization of the electroreceptor potential by illumination.

Two anticipated advantages of the imaging member are: improved erase functions by virtue of the ability to generate charge carriers within the receptor to achieve internal, rather than only top surface, neutralization of receptor potential; and simplified erase systems design and adjustment since a simple illumination source of adequate intensity would displace the corona contact means used to erase ionographic receptors by top surface contact. In

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vo1.17 No. 5 SeptembedOctober 1992 407

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PHOTO ERASABLE INOGRAPHIC RECEPTOR (Cont'd)

addition to eliminating the critical design and adjustments necessary for top surface corona contact erasure, the associated generation of ozone and other corona effluents by such erase systems would be eliminated. An additional potential advantage of introducing photosensitivity into an...