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Browse Prior Art Database

TONER FLOW ENHANCEMENT BY CHEMICAL SURFACE MODIFICATIONS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026630D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 110K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Disclosed is a process for obtaining toners with excellent flow characteristics by accomplishing an oxidation and optional metal chelation of the toner surface. A toner surface oxidation reaction of in-situ prepared toners improves toner flow characteristics. The process effectively removes most of toner surface hydroxy groups and is useful in conjunction with surface grafting or silylation reactions.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

TONER FLOW ENHANCEMENT Proposed Classification

BY CHEMICAL SURFACE US. C1.430/106 MODIFICATIONS Int. C1. G03g 09/08 Guerino G. Sacripante
Raj D. Pate1
Grazyna E. Kmiecik-Lawrynowicz
Lurdes M. Martins

Disclosed is a process for obtaining toners with excellent flow characteristics by accomplishing an oxidation and optional metal chelation of the toner surface. A toner surface oxidation reaction of in-situ prepared toners improves toner flow characteristics. The process effectively removes most of toner surface hydroxy groups and is useful in conjunction with surface grafting or silylation reactions.

The toner compositions to be oxidized and metal chelated can be prepared by a simple one-pot process involving formation of stabilized particle suspension, followed by a core resin forming free radical polymerization within the particles. The process is comprised of, for example, (1) thoroughly mixing or blending a mixture of core resin monomers, optional preformed core resins, free radical initiators, and colorants; (2) dispersing the aforementioned well blended mixture by high shear blending to form stabilized microdroplets of specific droplet size, such as from about 3 microns in diameter to about 11 microns in diameter, in an aqueous medium containing a suitable cellulose polymer, such as TYLOSE* and an optional inorganic surfactant, and wherein the volume average microdroplet diameter can be desirably adjusted to be from about 2 microns to about 30 microns with the volume average droplet size dispersity being less than 1.35 as inferred from a Coulter Counter; (3) effecting free radical polymerization to form the core resin by heating; (4) simultan...