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FAX ROUTING VIA PRINTED DIGITAL ENCODINGS ON BUSINESS CARDS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026666D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Feb-28
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 122K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

To provide a convenient system for routing incoming facsimile transmissions to an electronic mail system, or to an image storage system, or to a facsimile distribution system. Problem in the Prior Art:

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

FAX ROUTING VIA PRINTED DIGITAL ENCODINGS ON U.S. C1.379/100 BUSINESS CARDS
Larry Masinter
Walter A.L. Johnson

Proposed Classification

Int. Cl. H04M 11/00

To provide a convenient system for routing incoming facsimile transmissions to an electronic mail system, or to an image storage system, or to a facsimile distribution system.

Problem in the Prior Art:

Documents sent via fascimile typically go from one fax machine to another. If no one is available to receive and read or route the incoming fax, it remains in the fax machine's hopper until a person becomes available. Systems that are available to automate this process currently require the use of a somewhat complicated and unresponsive touch-tone phone interface (e.g., Xerox's FaxMaster, or ATT's newly advertised fax distribution service). We propose to further simplify this process by printing a digitally encoded Electronic Mail address or Storage Location on the obverse side of one's business card. The sender makes a faxable copy of the obverse side of the card and uses this as a cover sheet for the fax transmission. A fax server (see Johnson et al., U.S. Patent No. 5,060,980) can receive the transmission and decode the encoded information on the cover sheet; based on this, the fax server can forward an image of the document to a file server, or mail the image (or a pointer to its stored location) to the appropriate recipient, or fax it to a more appropriate recipient machine (e.g., the recipient could use this as a way of "fax forwarding" much as we use "call forwarding" in our telephone service). Any number of users could use the service, since one fax server can read anyone's encoded information.

Description:

Printed on the obverse of a person's business card is a digital, or perhaps even bar coded, encoding of the person's identity. When a copy of this image is faxed to a fax server, software examines the transmitted image to determine if it contains such an object and, if so, the software decod...