Browse Prior Art Database

THREE-DIMENSIONAL VISION / NON-CONTACT MEASUREMENT INSPECTION CELL

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026755D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Jun-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-06
Document File: 6 page(s) / 289K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Disclosed is an automated three dimensional inspection cell and method to perform non-contact measurement and inspection of objects (or units) to determine their presence, absence and dimensions. The automated inspection process uses cameras and range sensing devices to enable three dimensional inspection of the objects in order to insure that they are properly aligned and assembled during manufacture. A block diagram of inspection cell 10 is shown in Figure 1. Communication between detection system 2, robot controller 4 and height measurement system 8 is centralized through vision processor (or cell controller) 6. External to cell 10, vision processor 6 interfaces with manufacture assembly systems (not shown) such as a conveyor system which provides the necessary signals to initiate the inspection process. After inspection, any resulting data from cell 10 is relayed to a central processing system (not shown) in order to provide feedback to operators of assembly stations.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

THREE-DIMENSIONAL VISION / Proposed Classification NON-CONTACT MEASUREMENT U.S. C1.901/046 INSPECTION CELL
Andrea P. Richardson, Alvaro J. Chaves
Mansoor Ghazizadeh, Mark T. Strang
Jan J. Van Der Steen, Teresa W. Light
Anthony S. Minniti, Theon Sanders

Int. C1. B25j 11/00

f"

  ROBOT CONTROLLER

I

f" f8

FIG. I

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 18, No. 3 May/June 1993 339

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THREE-DIMENSIONAL VISION / NON-CONTACT MEASUREMENT INSPECTION CELL (Cont'd)

340 XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 18, No. 3 May/June 1993

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THREE-DIMENSIONAL VISION / NON-CONTACT MEASUREMENT INSPECTION CELL (Cont'd)

Disclosed is an automated three dimensional inspection cell and method to perform non-contact measurement and inspection of objects (or units) to determine their presence, absence and dimensions. The automated inspection process uses cameras and range sensing devices to enable three dimensional inspection of the objects in order to insure that they are properly aligned and assembled during manufacture. A block diagram of inspection cell 10 is shown in Figure 1. Communication between detection system 2, robot controller 4 and height measurement system 8 is centralized through vision processor (or cell controller) 6. External to cell 10, vision processor 6 interfaces with manufacture assembly systems (not shown) such as a conveyor system which provides the necessary signals to initiate the inspection process. After inspection, any resulting data from cell 10 is relayed to a central processing system (not shown) in order to provide feedback to operators of assembly stations.

Inspection cell 10 is shown in further detail in Figure 2. The cell's three dimensional non-contact measurement capability is provided by camera 12 and range sensing devices 14, which are mounted on robot arm 16. Robot arm 16 is programed through cell controller 8 for movement over surface of interest
17. Range sensors 14 are comprised of laser-based optical technology to measure the distance between surface 17 and sensors 14, providing the object is within operational boundaries of the sensors. Camera 12 measures objects in the horizontal plane while sensors 14 measure objects in the vertical plane.

Sensors 14 are made up of individual sensors 18 and 19, which maximize the flexibility of height measurement applications by facilitating "top down" measurements. The sensors in the inspection cell contain light emitting and receiving optics within the same unit. Signals emitted from the lasers are projected onto surface 17 and reflected back to the receiver optics of the sensors. The combination of range emitting and sensing optics into one unit requires that only a single unit be mounted on robot arm 16. Sensor unit 19 is directed towards measuring the change in vertical height from the sensor to the object along the z-axis, while sensor...