Browse Prior Art Database

SINGLE PASS DUPLEX WITH SIMULTANEOUS MARKING IN A THERMALINK JET SYSTEM

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026801D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Oct-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-06
Document File: 4 page(s) / 226K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

This disclosure describes multiple architectures for a single pass, duplex printing system employing full width array Ink Jet assemblies as the marking mechanism. Moreover, each of the architectures depicted in Figures 1, 2, 3A and 3B employ a pair of simultaneously firing Thermal Ink Jet full width arrays. The direct marking capability of a Thermal Ink Jet marking assembly lends itself to a compact cost effective arrangement to deliver efficient single pass duplex performance. Several advantages are notable with respect to this concept. First, as in all two-pass Thermal Ink Jet systems, and even in a single pass tandem Thermal Ink Jet system, cockle growth from first side printing can significantly impact second side print quality and reliability. In fact, cockle growth may be so large as to render duplex printing in such systems unfeasible. In this concept, because both sides are printed virtually at the same time, duplex performance is achieved without the inherent problems related to cockle. This concept also offers print station redundancy, where in the event of a printhead failure, the printer may still deliver simplex prints prior to the point at which service for the machine can be obtained, thereby improving the overall up-time of the system.

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Page 1 of 4

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

SINGLE PASS DUPLEX WITH SIMULTANEOUS MARKING IN A THERMALINK JET SYSTEM Bruce J. Parks
William R. Burger
Edward
C. Hanzlik

Proposed Classification
U.S. C1.346/140R Int.
C1. Gold 15/16

FIG. I

26 14 16

- 13

FIG. 2

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vo1.18,No. 5 SeptembedOctober 1993 487

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Page 2 of 4

SINGLE PASS DUPLEX WITH SIMULTANEOUS MARKING IN A THERMAL INK JET SYSTEM(Cont'd)

I 26 14 16

/ I

/

FIG. 38

488 XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - V01.18,No. 5 September /October 1993

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 3 of 4

SINGLE PASS DUPLEX WITH SIMULTANEOUS MARKING IN A THERMAL INK JET SYSTEM(Cont'd)

This disclosure describes multiple architectures for a single pass, duplex printing system employing full width array Ink Jet assemblies as the marking mechanism. Moreover, each of the architectures depicted in Figures 1, 2, 3A
and 3B employ a pair of simultaneously firing Thermal Ink Jet full width arrays. The direct marking capability of a Thermal Ink Jet marking assembly lends itself to a compact cost effective arrangement to deliver efficient single pass duplex performance. Several advantages are notable with respect to this concept. First, as in all two-pass Thermal Ink Jet systems, and even in a single pass tandem Thermal Ink Jet system, cockle growth from first side printing can significantly impact second side print quality and reliability. In fact, cockle growth may be so large as to render duplex printing in such systems unfeasible. In this concept, because both sides are printed virtually at the same time, duplex performance is achieved without the inherent problems related to cockle. This concept also offers print station redundancy, where in the event of a printhead failure, the printer may still deliver simplex prints prior to the point at which service for the machine can be obtained, thereby improving the overall up-time of the system.

Three fundamentally different systems are disclosed in the following description. Beginning with Figure 1, which depicts a web-type paper supply 12, which supplies paper to be fed past both full width array assemblies 14
wherein the images are placed on both sides of the web as it passes therebetween. Subsequent to imaging, dryers 16 are used to dry the images thereon. The web is then advanced through guide rollers 18 where it is cut to the appropriate length by cutter 20 and advanced then to an output tray where the remainder of the cut sheets 22 are stacked. The architecture also includes a full width array printhead maintenance station 26 for both of the printheads when not in use. Furthermore, a scrap bin 28 and cutter sensor 30 lie beneath the web at the output end to collect the scrap pieces of paper as they are cut and to assure a complete cut of the web as it is fed past cutter 20. The architecture depicted in Figure 1 is further characterized by a tension web whereby the paper web is maintained...