Browse Prior Art Database

STACKING TRAY SYSTEM WITH NONVERTICALLY RECEDING ELEVATOR YIELDING SQUARE STACKS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026815D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Oct-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-06
Document File: 4 page(s) / 219K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Proposed is a sheet stacking system for stacking the sequential sheet output of a reproducing apparatus. The proposed system is integral to a xerographic or other such precollation copier or printer, and utilizes a novel inclined end wall, of the machine itself, for square stacking registration of large copy sets. An elevator is located inside the machine behind the unique end wall. The elevator system is located so as to not present a safety hazard.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

STACKING TRAY SYSTEM WITH NONVERTICALLY RECEDING U.S. C1.355/322 ELEVATOR YIELDING SQUARE
STACKS
Barry P. Mandel

Proposed Classification

Int. C1. G03g 21/00

- 13

14

f

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vo1.18,No. 5 September/October 1993 525

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

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STACKING TRAY SYSTEM WITH NONVERTICALLY RECEDING ELEVATOR YIELDING SQUARE STACKS(Cont'd)

Proposed is a sheet stacking system for stacking the sequential sheet output of a reproducing apparatus. The proposed system is integral to a xerographic or other such precollation copier or printer, and utilizes a novel inclined end wall, of the machine itself, for square stacking registration of large copy sets. An elevator is located inside the machine behind the unique end wall. The elevator system is located so as to not present a safety hazard.

Conventional copiers or printers have either normal vertical walls, or other nonfunctional shapes. Vertical end walls cause uneven or unstable stacking when used with an inclined stacking tray. Here, the inclined end wall of the printing machine itself is a continuous registration surface for a square, downhill, stacking system. The sheet stacking system is capable of stacking very large stacks of paper which are squarely registered so as not to tip over either in a stacking tray or after the stack is removed from the machine and placed on a normal horizontal surface. While the paper stack is in the stacking tray, the entire copiedprinter machine provides the necessary counterbalance.

The accompanying Figure is a schematic front view of one exemplary copy sheet output system incorporating one example of the present stacking system, showing one exemplary nonvertical tray elevator. Referring particularly to the Figure, there is shown one example of a sheet output system 10, at the output 12 of a copier or printer to provide improved output sheet 11 stacking 13 selection and control. This proposed embodiment transports sheets to a sheet receiving and stacking system 14 for stacking them in a stack 13. That is, there is shown in this output system 10 an example of a high-capacity elevator type stacking tray or stacker system 14, closely adjacent the output 12 feeding nip, for being fed sheets or sets of sheets for stacking.

This exemplary stacking system 14 provides an otherwise conventional movable stacking tray unit 16 mounted in a linear, but nonvertical, elevator track 18 to be moved by any suitable elevator system or mechanism 20 to provide a moving floor stacking surface 16a for the accumulating stack of sheets in the stacking tray unit 14. The stacking surface 16a moves linearly, but nonvertically, maintaining a desired stacking angle of inclination as previously discussed. A conventional tray elevator system 20 controlled by a conventional stack height sensor can be used to maintain the top of the stack at an approximately constant level, and in the same relative position...