Browse Prior Art Database

NOVEL BUBBLE JET DIE PACKAGING METHODS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026825D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Oct-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-06
Document File: 6 page(s) / 232K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

To date, the production packaging of functional bubble jet die print elements has been a costly, manpower intensive, and error sensitive process which does not lend itself well to high volume automated assembly methods. Present schemes involve many separate process steps to fabricate the print element. The ideal manufacturing environment would be one in which a minimum number of low cost parts are assembled quickly in as few steps as possible, with minimum tooling.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Page 1 of 6

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

NOVEL BUBBLE JET DIE PACKAGING METHODS Dennis Tilton

Proposed Classification US. C1.437/51
Int. C1. HOll21/70

FIG. I 0

\

16 18 16

BACK VEIW

FIG. 2A PAD

SIDE VEIW

FIG. 2B

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol.l8,No. 5 SeptembedOctober 1993 573

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 2 of 6

NOVEL BUBBLE JET DIE PACKAGING METHODS(Cont'd)

\

26

FIG. 3

BJ H

21

             I > 20 INK PASSAGE I

1

_______-------

FIG= 4

574 XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol.18,No. 5 September /October 1993

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 3 of 6

NOVEL BUBBLE JET DIE PACKAGING METHODS(Contrd)

FIG. 5

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol.18,No. 5 SeptembedOctober 1993 575

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 4 of 6

NOVEL BUBBLE JET DIE PACKAGING METHODS(Cont'd)

To date, the production packaging of functional bubble jet die print elements has been a costly, manpower intensive, and error sensitive process which does not lend itself well to high volume automated assembly methods. Present schemes involve many separate process steps to fabricate the print element. The ideal manufacturing environment would be one in which a minimum number of low cost parts are assembled quickly in as few steps as possible, with minimum tooling.

Figures 1 through 4 illustrate how two sided orientation dependent etching (ODE) and three dimensional printed circuitry make it possible to mount, bond and electrically connect a bubble jet die to a substrate in one simple operation. More specifically, Figure 1 shows a bubble jet die 10 which has an ODE contact window 12. Also included on the bubble jet die is an electrical contact pad 14 within each of the ODE contact windows 12. Moreover, ODE alignment recesses 16 can be used to enable alignment of the bubble jet die with a printed circuit board to which the die is attached. Also, the bubble jet die includes one or more ink jet inlets 18 as shown in the Figure.

Because of the orientation dependent etching of the bubble jet die, as shown in Figures 2A and 2B, various contacts can be made with the bubble jet die circuitry by a mechanical process. As further shown in Figure 3, the bubble jet die 10 can be placed upon the three-dimensional circuit - ink gallery illustrated generally by reference numeral 20. In order to assure proper alignment of the bubble jet die with the underlying components, the alignment recesses 16, as shown in Figure 3, are mated with molded alignment features 26 that are present on the three-dimensional circuitry. The underlying circuitry on circuit 21 includes copper traces 22 and a non-conductive adhesive
24. The adhesive is used to seal the ink jet manifold to the underlying ink inlets of the bubble jet die. Moreover, once the bubble jet die is assembled with the underlying circuitry, the copper traces contact the electrical contact pads 14 that lie on the underside thereof within the ODE contact windows 12, as shown in Figure 1.

Referring again t...