Browse Prior Art Database

INTERACTIVE VIDEO TOOL FOR USE WITH PRINTING MACHINES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026829D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 99K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

A CD-ROM database containing high resolution still pictures and motion video and audio to be displayed on CRT user interfaces of printing machines for diagnostic and tutorial use is proposed. Current interactive video technology provides near instantaneous access to thousands of high resolution still pictures or several minutes of extremely high quality full motion video and audio. Interactive video technology uses compact disc (CD) technology very similar to music CDs and laser discs used for movies. An interactive video player allows precise and fast access to specific segments of a CD via computer control. Thus unlike video tape technology which requires fast forwarding or rewinding to a desired location, any segment of the CD disc can be accessed instantaneously by software control. Current CD technology also allows flicker free still frame display, which enables written material or high resolution still photos to be stored and displayed one frame at a time.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 54% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

INTERACTIVE VIDEO TOOL FOR USE WITH PRINTING MACHINES Brian C. Hawkins

Proposed Classification

U.S. C1.3551203 Int. C1. G03g 15/00

A CD-ROM database containing high resolution still pictures and motion video and audio to be displayed on CRT user interfaces of printing machines for diagnostic and tutorial use is proposed. Current interactive video technology provides near instantaneous access to thousands of high resolution still pictures or several minutes of extremely high quality full motion video and audio. Interactive video technology uses compact disc (CD) technology very similar to music CDs and laser discs used for movies. An interactive video player allows precise and fast access to specific segments of a CD via computer control. Thus unlike video tape technology which requires fast forwarding or rewinding to a desired location, any segment of the CD disc can be accessed instantaneously by software control. Current CD technology also allows flicker free still frame display, which enables written material or high resolution still photos to be stored and displayed one frame at a time.

Printing machines and copiers that have CRT user interfaces (UI) can be adapted to use full motion video and audio technology with a CD-ROM database, The CD-ROM database in each printing machine can contain high resolution still pictures and/or full motion video and audio depicting jam clearance, tutorials on machine operation and maintenance procedures, thereby eliminating the use of hard to read labels or cartoon-like graphics. Additionally, the...