Browse Prior Art Database

COMBINED DEVELOPER AND CLEANER WASTE CONTAINER IN COLOR XEROGRAPHIC ENGINES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026835D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 81K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

In colored xerographic engines, the space needed for multiple developer housing makes these housings smaller. Everything being equal, smaller housings contain smaller amounts of developer materials leading to shorter material life per charge of the developer material. A Trickle Development System is one method used to extend material life, however, the associated overflow box is an added dispersal problem and productivity constraint. Concurrently, colored toners with colorants imply having a cleaner-waste box, which may contain an unacceptable proportion of potentially hazardous materials, such as, for example, barium from red toner and copper from blue/green toners. Depending upon local regulations, the disposal of a filled cleaner-waste container can be an environmental problem. Thus, it is proposed to eliminate the trickle-overflow container while ensuring convenient disposal of the cleaner-waste container without an environmental issue. By transporting the developer emuent into the cleaner-waste container, the following benefits are achieved: (1) The method does not add a new waste container to existing products commonly accepted by the end user. From a customer viewpoint, a single waste container is preferable to two waste containers and nonhazardous waste disposal is highly desirable. (2) It improves system productivity, since an imperceptible increase of the frequency of cleaner-waste container replacement is more than offset by the total elimination of frequent developer-waste container replacements. (3) The method does not require special disposal handling of the cleaner-waste container, since the percentage by weight of potentially toxic materials lie below known and projectable and allowable limits.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

COMBINED DEVELOPER AND Proposed Classification CLEANER WASTE CONTAINER IN
COLOR XEROGRAPHIC ENGINES
Eugene L. Y ang
Leland Herriman
Joseph P. DeBlaere
Cesidio J. DeCesare
Douglas A. Lundy
Harry Ramos
Carl B. Hurwitch
Gail A. Y ander
Linda J. Nelson

U.S. C1.355/271 Int. C1. G03g 15/14

In colored xerographic engines, the space needed for multiple developer housing makes these housings smaller. Everything being equal, smaller housings contain smaller amounts of developer materials leading to shorter material life per charge of the developer material. A Trickle Development System is one method used to extend material life, however, the associated overflow box is an added dispersal problem and productivity constraint. Concurrently, colored toners with colorants imply having a cleaner-waste box, which may contain an unacceptable proportion of potentially hazardous materials, such as, for example, barium from red toner and copper from blue/green toners. Depending upon local regulations, the disposal of a filled cleaner-waste container can be an environmental problem. Thus, it is proposed to eliminate the trickle-overflow container while ensuring convenient disposal of the cleaner-waste container without an environmental issue. By transporting the developer emuent into the cleaner-waste container, the following benefits are achieved: (1) The method does not add a new waste container to existing products commonly accepted by the end user. From a c...