Browse Prior Art Database

MICR IMAGES CREATED USING A MAGNETIC SINGLE COMPONENT DEVELOPER

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026860D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Feb-28
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 130K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Most xerographic printing machines produce non-magnetically readable toner images. Formulating images capable of magnetic ink character recognition (MICR) requires the development of alternate toner formulations along with the possible redesign of printing machine development systems. In most applications, such as bank checks, only a segment of a copy or reproduced image need be machine readable (e.g. only the bank number and the amount is magnetically readable on each check). One known method converts a standard toner image to magnetic machine readable image using a ribbon consisting of a support with a strippable magnetic layer. In converting images using this method, the ribbon is forced into contact with a xerographic image using a heated roller that tackifies the toner image, thereby attaching the magnetic layer to the image. The ribbon is subsequently stripped from the copy leaving the magnetic layer on top of the toner image. Problems with this method include: toner tactification temperatures that vary greatly depending on the type of toner used in producing the original image; a magnetic layer that must have low adhesion for support so that it is properly removed in areas surrounded by toner (e.g. the letter "0"); and waste generated from the disposal of each ribbon partially used magnetic layer.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

MICR IMAGES CREATED USING A MAGNETIC SINGLE COMPONENT U.S. C1.355/200 DEVELOPER Int. C1. G03g 15/00 Lloyd F. Bean

Proposed Classification

Most xerographic printing machines produce non-magnetically readable toner images. Formulating images capable of magnetic ink character recognition (MICR) requires the development of alternate toner formulations along with the possible redesign of printing machine development systems. In most applications, such as bank checks, only a segment of a copy or reproduced image need be machine readable (e.g. only the bank number and the amount is magnetically readable on each check). One known method converts a standard toner image to magnetic machine readable image using a ribbon consisting of a support with a strippable magnetic layer. In converting images using this method, the ribbon is forced into contact with a xerographic image using a heated roller that tackifies the toner image, thereby attaching the magnetic layer to the image. The ribbon is subsequently stripped from the copy leaving the magnetic layer on top of the toner image. Problems with this method include: toner tactification temperatures that vary greatly depending on the type of toner used in producing the original image; a magnetic layer that must have low adhesion for support so that it is properly removed in areas surrounded by toner (e.g. the letter "0"); and waste generated from the disposal of each ribbon partially used magnetic layer.

A method is disclosed of converting a standard xerographic image to a MICR (magnetically ink character readable) image using a single component development system that includes a mini-conductive magnetic toner brush and a mini-fuser. The system first forms a highly resistive toner image by selectively applying a voltage to a standard xerographic toner image using the mini-conductive magnetic toner brush. Subsequently, magnetic toner is deposited on the highly resistive toner image (p 2 1014 ohm-cm) and not deposited in any relatively conducting non-imaged areas (paper, p S...