Browse Prior Art Database

VIBRATIONALLY EXCITED SENSOR CALIBRATION TARGET

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026873D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Feb-28
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-06
Document File: 2 page(s) / 90K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Electronic capture of data from a document is achieved in many scanning devices through the use of electronic sensors (e.g., charge-coupled devices and full-width arrays). The data is collected by the sensor during relative motion between the document and the sensor, thereby creating an electronic two-dimensional representation of an original document. This disclosure is particularly addressed to those scanning devices which move a document past a stationary sensor, however, the reader will appreciate the extendability of the disclosure to scanning devices where the sensor moves relative to a stationary document.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

VIBRATIONALLY EXCITED Proposed Classification SENSOR CALIBRATION TARGET U.S. C1.358/445 Wayne A. Buchar
Int. Eugene A. Rogalski C1. H04n 1/40

Electronic capture of data from a document is achieved in many scanning devices through the use of electronic sensors (e.g., charge-coupled devices and full-width arrays). The data is collected by the sensor during relative motion between the document and the sensor, thereby creating an electronic two- dimensional representation of an original document. This disclosure is particularly addressed to those scanning devices which move a document past a stationary sensor, however, the reader will appreciate the extendability of the disclosure to scanning devices where the sensor moves relative to a stationary document.

In many scanners, there is a need to calibrate the sensor against a standard surface having a known and predefined optical quality. Typically, calibration to a known optical surface is done to adjust the signal gain of the sensor for a desired dynamic range (gain correction) and enables shifting of that range to a defined signal level (offset correction). The gain and offset corrections determined during calibration of the sensor are sensitive to the surface granularity of the calibration surface, as well as surface contamination.

This disclosure proposes the use of a moveable calibration target having a standard calibration surface located thereon so as to reduce the affect of contaminent...