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GESTURAL USER INTERFACE TECHNIQUE FOR CONTROLLING THE PLAYBACK OF SEQUENTIAL MEDIA

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026910D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Apr-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-07
Document File: 4 page(s) / 219K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Touch sensitive display surfaces, such as the touch tablet 10 illustrated in Figure 1, along with a stylus input device 20, are becoming increasingly common as input devices in computer systems known as gesture-based or pen-based computing systems. These systems typically also employ direct manipulation graphical user interfaces (GUIs) as the primary communication mechanism between the user and the computer. Typically, a gesture-based system will display well-known graphical display objects of a conventional graphical user interface, such as menus, icons, and windows, on the touch tablet, and the user may manipulate these display objects with the stylus device, in addition to being able to directly input handwritten text and graphical symbols by writing on the touch sensitive display surface with the stylus. The ability to input both data (e.g:, handwritten text) and commands by entering command gestures or by manipulating graphical display objects with the same stylus input device greatly simplifies and improves the input process for the user. As a result, many functions implemented in conventional

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

GESTURAL USER INTERFACE Proposed Classification TECHNIQUE FOR CONTROLLING U.S. C1.395/161 THE PLAYBACK OF SEQUENTIAL
MEDIA
Alex Poon
Karon Anne Weber

Int. C1. G06f 15/00

f14

              Sequential Processor Media

Device

Fig. I

32 34 36 38

46 Fig. 2

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 19, No. 2 MarcMApril 1994 187

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

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GESTURAL USER INTERFACE TECHNIQUE FOR CONTROLLING THE PLAYBACK OF SEQUENTIAL MEDIA(Cont'd)

Touch sensitive display surfaces, such as the touch tablet 10 illustrated in Figure 1, along with a stylus input device 20, are becoming increasingly common as input devices in computer systems known as gesture-based or pen- based computing systems. These systems typically also employ direct manipulation graphical user interfaces (GUIs) as the primary communication mechanism between the user and the computer. Typically, a gesture-based system will display well-known graphical display objects of a conventional graphical user interface, such as menus, icons, and windows, on the touch tablet, and the user may manipulate these display objects with the stylus device, in addition to being able to directly input handwritten text and graphical symbols by writing on the touch sensitive display surface with the stylus. The ability to input both data (e.g:, handwritten text) and commands by entering command gestures or by manipulating graphical display objects with the same stylus input device greatly simplifies and improves the input process for the user. As a result, many functions implemented in conventional

GUIs that require a pointing device such as a mouse to manipulate may also be implemented in a gesture-based system, sometimes with enhanced functionality or simplicity derived from the more natural use of a pen-like device. Such an interactive gesture-based graphical user interface function is proposed here for controlling the playback of a sequential media device 50 (Fig.
1) such as a video cassette recorder (VCR) or audio tape player. Sequential media device 50 will hereafter be referred to as a VCR, but it is intended to include any suitable device for playing sequential media.

Figure 1 shows window 30 on touch tablet 10 having five graphical display objects that function as controls for the VCR 50 and that simulate the shape of buttons. These controls mimic the standard buttons found on all VCR control panels to control the videotape, and are illustrated in more detail in Figure 2: reverse button 32; stop button 34; play button 36; fast forward button 38; and pause button 40. The user simply touches the button display object of the videotape function he or she wishes to initiate with stylus 20. The location of the contact with the touch sensitive surface is communicated to the computer system's processor 14 (Fig. l), which in turn decodes the contact location, matches it to the appropriate function, and sends a properly formatted message to the VCR 50 to i...