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INK CONNECTION SEALING SURFACE TO ACCOMMODATE A VARIABLE THICKNESS PRINTHEAD DIE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026942D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Aug-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-07
Document File: 6 page(s) / 266K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

For a certain class of ink jet printheads, it is required to make a reliable seal between the ink delivery system and a substantially flat printhead die having ink inlet holes as shown in Figure 1, wherein Figure 1 is a top view of a thermal ink jet printhead die 10, having a plurality of ink inlet holes 20 and an ink seal area 22. A component (not shown) which has tubing connectors for ink delivery and optional vent, as well as a slotted sealing surface to mate to the printhead die, is known as an ink manifold. A screen printed wet seal approach was developed and deposits a uniform thickness of sealing material, such as silicone, in the narrow sealing regions of a thermal inkjet printhead die. While the printed material is still wet (uncured), the sealing surface of the manifold is brought into contact with the seal material on the printhead die, and the material is allowed to cure. Typically, the manifold has legs on both ends of the die, as well as posts further back to level the manifold. However, there exists a problem in determining the ideal height to make the legs and posts, as well as manufacturing these features to the required tolerances.

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Page 1 of 6

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

INK CONNECTION SEALING Proposed Classification SURFACE TO ACCOMMODATE A
VARIABLE THICKNESS
PRINTHEAD DIE
Gary A. Kneezel
Peter J. John

U.S. C1.346/075 Int. C1. Gold 15/18

22 FIG. I

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 19, No. 4 July/August 1994 271

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INK CONNECTION SEALING SURFACE TO ACCOMMODATE A VARIABLE THICKNESS PRINTHEAD DIE(Cont'd)

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272 XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 19, No. 4 July/August 1994

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Page 3 of 6

INK CONNECTION SEALING SURFACE TO ACCOMMODATE A VARIABLE THICKNESS PRINTHEAD DIE(Cont'd)

For a certain class of ink jet printheads, it is required to make a reliable seal between the ink delivery system and a substantially flat printhead die having ink inlet holes as shown in Figure 1, wherein Figure 1 is a top view of a thermal ink jet printhead die 10, having a plurality of ink inlet holes 20 and an ink seal area 22. A component (not shown) which has tubing connectors for ink delivery and optional vent, as well as a slotted sealing surface to mate to the printhead die, is known as an ink manifold. A screen printed wet seal approach was developed and deposits a uniform thickness of sealing material, such as silicone, in the narrow sealing regions of a thermal inkjet printhead die. While the printed material is still wet (uncured), the sealing surface of the manifold is brought into contact with the seal material on the printhead die, and the material is allowed to cure. Typically, the manifold has legs on both ends of the die, as well as posts further back to level the manifold. However, there exists a problem in determining the ideal height to make the legs and posts, as well as manufacturing these features to the required tolerances.

In one manifold design, the leg and post height was selected to be 0.001 of an inch higher than the nominal thickness of the printhead die plus the die bond epoxy with which it is bonded to the substrate. In this way, the legs serve as a mechanical stop when the manifold is bonded to the die, and the screen printed wet seal (printed approximately 0.0025 to 0.003 of an inch thick) is compressed sufficiently to make a good seal, but not so much as to cause seal material to flow into the inlets or beyond the front edge of the die. For this manifold, the tolerances of the manifold features are maintained through injection molding. However, the die assembly thickness itself can vary byf0.002 of an inch. Die which are too thin may not seal properly, and die which are too thick can potentially cause excess flowing of the seal material. One solution is to minimize the variation in thickness of the die assembly. The die assembly comprises: two silicon wafers, a heater plate which contains the electronics for the thermal ink jet die, and the channel plate which contains the ink flow paths. Each of these wafers varies typically by...