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COROTRON WIRE AND TERMINAL FABRICATION PROCESS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026970D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Oct-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-07
Document File: 6 page(s) / 219K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

In reprographic machines, the corona generated by passing a constant voltage through a corotron wire is proportional to the tension of the wire. Often, the wire tension varies with the skill of the service person who installs the wire, either initially or as a replacement. In addition to the variations in tension, if the wire is handled by an uncovered hand, oily secretions are deposited on the wire, resulting in 'hot spots' on the wire which manifest as transfer deletions, and a shortened wire life.

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Page 1 of 6

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

COROTRON WIRE AND TERMINAL FABRICATION PROCESS US. C1.140/105
Mark A. Adiletta

Proposed Classification

Int. C1. B21f 01/00

10 12

10

14

FIG. I

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 19, No. 5 September/October 1994 347

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 2 of 6

COROTRON WIRE AND TERMINAL FABRICATION PROCESS(Cont'd)

D C B A

A Y A

I I I I I

I

I I I I I I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I I I I

I I

FIG. 2

348 XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 19, No. 3 September/October 1994

Lug Forming 8t Wire Crimping

&Trim Test Packaging & Marking II

 spot Welding of Lugs

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Page 3 of 6

COROTRON WIRE AND TERMINAL FABRICATION PROCE SS(Cont'd)

20

FIG. 3

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 19, No. 5 Septernber/October 1994 349

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 4 of 6

COROTRON WIRE AND TERMINAL FABRICATION P ROCE SS( Cont'd)

In reprographic machines, the corona generated by passing a constant voltage through a corotron wire is proportional to the tension of the wire. Often, the wire tension varies with the skill of the service person who installs the wire, either initially or as a replacement. In addition to the variations in tension, if the wire is handled by an uncovered hand, oily secretions are deposited on the wire, resulting in 'hot spots' on the wire which manifest as transfer deletions, and a shortened wire life.

In order to improve the reliability of corotron wires and facilitate an easier installation process, the idea proposed herein is to provide a pre-cut corotron wire 10 with brass terminals 12 (e.g., eyeloops) crimped onto each end as illustrated in Figure 1. The wire, with the terminals in place, can then be hooked onto a fixed post at one end of the corotron and an extension spring at the other end. This assures constant tension on the wire under all situations. To facilitate installation, the wire packaged in a tubular plastic container similar 14 to a drinking straw, which allows installation into the corotron without human contact with the wire itself.

The present disclosure describes an automated machine that can not only stamp out the brass terminals, but also string the corotron wire to the correct length, position it under the terminals, crimp it, cut it, and subsequently insert it into the tubular container in an automated process that avoids any handling of the wire. The crimping process described herein is critical as the oscillation of the wire at a very high frequencies cause it to vibrate loose when simple mechanical crimping is employed. In addition, the tungsten used for the corotron wire itself cannot readily be welded to a dissimilar metal without melting of the dissimilar metal, due to the high temperature required to weld tungsten. It was, however, determined that welding the brass terminal around the wire provided a crimp that was not detrimental to the brass terminals, yet exceeded the tensile strength of the wire...