Browse Prior Art Database

IMPROVED SMALL SET AUTOMATIC STAPLING

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000026989D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Oct-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 138K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Automatic reduction may be provided of the excessive stapling force of electric staplers on small (e.g., 2-3 sheet) sets, by IR transmissive sensing of such small sets and automatic reduction or early termination of the current pulse applied to the staple driver solenoid.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

IMPROVED SMALL SET AUTO- MATIC STAPLING U.S. C1.355/324 Paul F. Morgan

Proposed Classification

Int. C1. G03g 21/00

Automatic reduction may be provided of the excessive stapling force of electric staplers on small (e.g., 2-3 sheet) sets, by IR transmissive sensing of such small sets and automatic reduction or early termination of the current pulse applied to the staple driver solenoid.

Automatic on-line electric stapling of collated job sets has become a desired and common feature for the output of copiers and printers. That includes even some lower volume non-collated copier output being post-collated in sorter bins, since many Japanese copier products now provide in-bin set stapling. Automatic set stapling is provided in most precollated systems (RDH copiers, or electronic printers), usually with on-line collator/staplers and finished set stackers. It is also desirable for shared user printer mailbox output. Electric staplers are made by "Swingline@", "MAXTM", "Bostitch TM " , etc..

Common customer job sets to be fastened (finished) are only 2 or 3 sheet letters, memos, electric mail notes, etc.. Yet, electric staplers must typically provide a high driving force sufficient for staple penetration of up to 50 or more sheets, since that may also be needed. The stapling force is commonly provided by a solenoid staple driver (with or without an active clincher) fed a high current pulse when the stapler is activated. See, e.g., the electric stapler patents of Xerox Corporation US. 5,094,379 and 4,830,256. This high staple driving force for penetrating such thick stacks often drives the staple head through the top sheet of small (2-3) sheet sets, so that the top sheet becomes easily detached and separated, thus easily lost or mixed with other commonly stacked sets. As disclosed in said electric stapler references, typically the driving current is built up from a D.C. supply, which is stored in a capacitor, and discharged via a triad or other high current switch to the driving solenoid.

Proposed here is a relatively high intensity LED IR transmitter, and IR receiver or sensor (which sensor pairs are commercially available at relatively low cost), respectively mounted on opposite sides of the existing stapler set insert slot, where there is usually an existing mechanical set insert switch already connected to the stapler circuit (to activat...