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PREVENTING DIRT BUILD-UP ON A TRANSPORT BELT IN AN ORIGINAL DOCUMENT HANDLER

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000027043D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Feb-28
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 74K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Document handlers used for placing a sequence of original documents on a platen for automatic photocopying thereof typically transport the original documents on a rotating belt which is wide enough to contact the entire back surface of each original document. These document handler belts run at high velocities and, because they indirectly rub against the glass platen, essentially act as van de GrafY generators, accumulating significant amounts of static charge. The presence of this static charge is conducive to the attraction of dirt on the outside surface of the belt.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

PREVENTING DIRT BUILD-UP ON A TRANSPORT BELT IN AN ORIGINAL DOCUMENT HANDLER Joseph H. Lang

Proposed Classification
U.S. C1.271/250 Int. C1. B65h 9/16

Document handlers used for placing a sequence of original documents on a platen for automatic photocopying thereof typically transport the original documents on a rotating belt which is wide enough to contact the entire back surface of each original document. These document handler belts run at high velocities and, because they indirectly rub against the glass platen, essentially act as van de GrafY generators, accumulating significant amounts of static charge. The presence of this static charge is conducive to the attraction of dirt on the outside surface of the belt.

One technique for avoiding this accumulation of static charge is to provide a discharge brush on the non-document-bearing side (inside) of the belt. This brush is connected to ground, and acts to remove the charge from the belt. However, a single brush extending across the belt may tend to discharge the belt non-uniformly, creating isolated accumulations of unremoved static charge, which attract dirt. Such static charge accumulations localized at discrete locations across the belt cause distinct stripes of dirt along the direction of motion of the belt, corresponding to areas where the grounding has been ineffective.

To prevent conspicuous dirt build-up7 the discharge brush must provide a substantially continuous and uniform...