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EXTENDIBLE POWER SUPPLY ARCHITECTURE FOR AN ELECTROPHOTOGRAPHIC PRINTER

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000027052D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Feb-28
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 88K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

An electrophotographic printer or copier includes many different subsystems which require widely different levels of voltage to operate. For example, some motors within the machine may operate at 110 volts; smaller paper-handling motors may operate as 12 or 24 volts; and electronic control devices may operate at as little as 5 volts. Further, certain devices which are specific to electrophotographic printing, such as development or charging apparatus, may operate at as high as 1,000 volts.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

EXTENDIBLE POWER SUPPLY Proposed Classification ARCHITECTURE FOR AN U.S. C1.355/69 ELECTROPHOTOGRAPHIC Int. C1. G03b 27/72
PRINTER
Thomas I. Yeh

An electrophotographic printer or copier includes many different subsystems which require widely different levels of voltage to operate. For example, some motors within the machine may operate at 110 volts; smaller paper-handling motors may operate as 12 or 24 volts; and electronic control devices may operate at as little as 5 volts. Further, certain devices which are specific to electrophotographic printing, such as development or charging apparatus, may operate at as high as 1,000 volts.

Proposed here is an architecture for distributing different voltages to the various subsystems in an electrophotographic printer or copier. The original source of electricity, such as from an electrical outlet, is first "stepped up" to approximately the highest necessary voltage in the entire system, such as from 110 volts AC to 1,000 volts (positive or negative) DC. This highest necessary voltage is then used as a "main" for all other necessary voltages in the machine. This main voltage source can be placed on a "rail," or central wire, which can be physically strung the length of the machine. A subsystem having a high voltage requirement, such as a charging unit, could receive the raw 1,000 volts from the main. Other subsystems requiring less voltage include independently-controllable shunt regulators or step...