Browse Prior Art Database

METHOD FOR IMPROVING COPIER DIAGNOSTIC SECURITY

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000027090D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Apr-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 66K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Electronic diagnostic systems being built into new copiers are extremely powerful and thorough in their ability to quickly diagnose system problems and identify preventive maintenance actions. In some cases, entry into the diagnostic system also gives valuable access to system information and free copying modes.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

METHOD FOR IMPROVING Proposed Classification COPIER DIAGNOSTIC SECURITY US. C1.355/203 Christopher J. Au Clair Int. C1. G06f 11/00

Electronic diagnostic systems being built into new copiers are extremely powerful and thorough in their ability to quickly diagnose system problems and identify preventive maintenance actions. In some cases, entry into the diagnostic system also gives valuable access to system information and free copying modes.

Diagnostic systems are so useful that it often makes servicing of copiers quite easy for third party service groups who illicitly gain access to the system's diagnostic routines. The access codes for diagnostics have historically been very passive in that the codes are not really much different from one model to the next.

This proposal utilizes the memory card slot already on some copiers. By this method, only memory cards that are appropriately programmed will allow access to the diagnostic routines. Software can easily require the presence of a coded memory card as entrance criteria to the diagnostic dialogs.

Security could be even further tightened, by the system's ability to record a Tech. Rep. ID card. The ID of the card on any given machine could then be monitored via the (Remote Interactive Interface) host computer. This would close the loop in tracking down cards that are either reported lost, "cracked", or copied by third party service organizations. The idea would be for the host to make card...