Browse Prior Art Database

SMART TRAY FOR PAPER SIZE INDICATION

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000027113D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Apr-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 94K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

An inexpensive method for detecting paper size in an electronic printing machine is proposed and shown in the accompanying Figure. The method comprises an electric circuit that may be screened, painted, or molded onto a paper tray to indicate the size of paper loaded in the tray. The circuit layout coincides with the outline of different paper sizes as they lay in the tray.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

SMART TRAY FOR PAPER SIZE INDICATION U.S. C1.355/308 Ronald W. Petty

Proposed Classification

Int. C1. G03g 21/00

4

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 20, No 2 March April 1995 187

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SMART TRAY FOR PAPER SIZE INDICATION (Cont'd)

An inexpensive method for detecting paper size in an electronic printing machine is proposed and shown in the accompanying Figure. The method comprises an electric circuit that may be screened, painted, or molded onto a paper tray to indicate the size of paper loaded in the tray. The circuit layout coincides with the outline of different paper sizes as they lay in the tray.

Referring to the Figure, there is shown one example of a paper tray system 10. The system comprises an elevator paper tray 26 and a paper guide 30 that feeds paper in a direction indicated by arrow 31. A plurality of electrically conductive strips 27 are applied to the tray 26 to form separate open-circuit outlines for each of the different paper sizes. The exterior ends of each conductive strip 27 are terminated to mating electrical contacts 28. Exactly half of the electrical contacts 28 are serially attached to a common electrical conductor 29 which, for example, may be connected to machine ground. The remaining contacts 28 are respectively connected to electrical conductors 32, 34, and 36 and, in turn, may be connected to the machine's core processor. The interior ends of each con...