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Browse Prior Art Database

RIDGES TO ENHANCE PHOTORECEPTOR BLADE CLEANING

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000027117D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Apr-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-07
Document File: 4 page(s) / 239K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Disclosed are electrophotographic imaging members comprising a supporting substrate with at least one electrophotographic imaging layer and an imaging surface wherein the imaging surface includes parallel ridges and valleys across the width of the imaging member. The parallel ridges and valleys on the imaging surface mimic the surface characteristics and roughness of a multiplicity of seamed or lap joined junctions used in the manufacture of endless belted photoreceptor devices. Thus, the ridges and valleys on the imaging surface, for example as shown in FIG 1 and FIG 2, respectively, for belt and d r d r o l l type photoreceptors, when used in conjunction with a blade cleaner in doctor mode with at least some fraction of blade tuck, provides enhanced blade cleaner performance and prevents the formation of "comet" deposits. Comet deposits may result from a build up of a combination of toner impacted onto the photoreceptor and loose magnetite particles found in magnetite containing toners.

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Page 1 of 4

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

RIDGES TO ENHANCE PHOTORECEPTOR BLADE CLEANING
Richard L. Schank
Richard W. Bigelow

Proposed Classification
U.S. Cl. 430/066
Int. C1. G03g 15/04

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 20, No. 2 March/Aprill995 195

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

Page 2 of 4

RIDGES TO ENHANCE PHOTORECEPTOR BLADE CLEANING

(Cont'd)

Disclosed are electrophotographic imaging members comprising a supporting substrate with at least one electrophotographic imaging layer and an imaging surface wherein the imaging surface includes parallel ridges and valleys across the width of the imaging member. The parallel ridges and valleys on the imaging surface mimic the surface characteristics and roughness of a multiplicity of seamed or lap joined junctions used in the manufacture of endless belted photoreceptor devices. Thus, the ridges and valleys on the imaging surface, for example as shown in FIG 1 and FIG 2, respectively, for belt and drdroll type photoreceptors, when used in conjunction with a blade cleaner in doctor mode with at least some fraction of blade tuck, provides enhanced blade cleaner performance and prevents the formation of "comet" deposits. Comet deposits may result from a build up of a combination of toner impacted onto the photoreceptor and loose magnetite particles found in magnetite containing toners.

EXAMPLES

1) A series of seam like ridges can be introduced in a photoreceptor belt or drum configuration by spray, dip or rod application. These ridges can be, for instance, as far apart as the length of the belt pitch or as close as several microns. The following illustrates the application of seam like ridges by spraying at a distance of the belt pitch using a Xerox Model 1065 photoreceptor.

Overcoat Solution: A 4.0 wt.% solids solution of a 50150 by weight Elvamide 8061 polyamide (DuPont Corp.) and m-tetrahydroxy tetraphenyl benzidine compound in an 80120 by weight blend of methyl alcohol and n-propyl alcohol was prepared. This solution also contained 1.0 weight percent (based on 4%
solids) Elvacite 2008 adhesive (DuPont).

Coating Procedure: The Xerox Model 1065 photoreceptor belt is placed upon a rotating drum or other fixture of the appropriate diameter. A mask is then placed over the belt having exposed areas of the desired width placed so that the distance between these open spaces is the distance of the belt pitch. While rotating the photoreceptor, the overcoat solution is applied by spraying to a desired final film thickness, as for instance, of 1-2 microns. The solvent was evaporated, the mask and belt are removed and the photoreceptor was dried in a 120°C oven for 30-60 minutes to fix the coating. These ridges can range in degree of surface texture depending on the overcoat formulation, the spraying condition...