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Addressing of Control Units for Diagnosis Purposes

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000027148D
Publication Date: 2004-Apr-07
Document File: 3 page(s) / 77K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

In order to both fulfill the legal regulations regarding the communication between a vehicle and an external test equipment for emissions-related diagnostics and to enable a consistent means of diagnosing various kinds of ECU:s in a vehicle, also if these units are attached to a sub-network, fixed normal addressing format is used to identify all units, which belong to a network in the vehicle that is delivered and/or assembled by a particular supplier/manufacturer. Mixed addressing format is used to identify units that are provided and installed by other suppliers/manufacturers. Thereby, the primary manufacturer may address all its internal control units in accordance with the relevant standards. At the same time, the primary manufacturer is provided with a standardized addressing interface towards any external control units.

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Addressing of Control Units for Diagnosis Purposes

In order to increase the efficiency and flexibility, the automotive industry has developed towards an increased use of network solu­tions for controlling various kinds of units and processes in the vehicles. For instance, the Con­troller Area Network (CAN) standard specifies a widely used means of accomplishing such a network in trucks, busses and other ve­hicles. Moreover, a diagnostic protocol called Keyword 2000 ren­ders it possible to interconnect different electronic control units (ECU:s) to form a network (a Key­word 2000 network). This type of network, in turn, may include one or more sub-networks. Each such sub-network is connected to the main network via an ECU, which has an interface both towards the main network and towards the sub-network in question.

Keyword 2000 also allows two different identifiers to address an ECU in a CAN, namely a fixed normal addres­sing and a mixed addressing. Fixed normal addres­sing repre­sents the stan­dard address format in a single network, whereas mixed addres­sing is used when performing diagnostic testing of control units within a sub-network.

So-called On-Board Diagnostic (OBD) systems may be used to perform tests whether a specific control unit connected to a CAN is ope­rating pro­perly. An on-board diagnostic facility, such as a dash­board mounted display, may provide access to infor­mation generated by the OBD system.

Although, according to Keyword 2000, it is technically possible to carry out a diagnostic testing of all control units which are con­nected to the above-mentioned main- and sub-networks using fixed normal and mixed addressing, this is not per­mitted according to the legal regulations regarding the com­munication between vehicle and an ex­ternal test equipment for emissions-related diagnostics. Namely, these regulations prescribe that only fixed normal addressing be used.

Therefore, in order to both fulfill these regulations and to enable a consistent means of diag­nosing various kinds of ECU:s in a vehicle, even if these units are attached to a sub-network, it is proposed that fixed normal addres­sing format be used to identify all units, which belong to a network in the vehicle that is delivered and/or assembled by a parti­cular supplier/manufac­turer, and that the mixed addres­sing format only be used to iden­tify units that are provided and installed by other supp­liers/manu­facturers.

Consequently, all ECU:s developed and installed by a primary manu­facturer, say Scania, Volvo, DaimlerChrysler, Iveco, Hino etc, are addressed by using fixed normal addres...