Browse Prior Art Database

METHOD FOR MATCHING TEXT STRINGS CONTAINING ACCENTED CHARACTERS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000027192D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Aug-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 87K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Character code standards, such as those used by Xerox Corporation, allow computer based systems to use more than one method of encoding accented characters in a text string. For example, an accented character could be encoded as a single character code representing a combined letter and accent in one bitmap (or contour), or the accented character could be encoded as two separate character codes, one for the letter and the other for the accent. In the second case, the system renders the two codes such that they appear as one when printed or displayed by applying one over the other. A problem arises in that if workstation software specifies a selection option using one accented character rendering scheme and the printer for such workstation employs another accented character rendering scheme, or operator entered selections, the strings will not match when compared by the system.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

METHOD FOR MATCHING TEXT Proposed Classification STRINGS CONTAINING ACCENTED U.S. C1.395/144 CHARACTERS Int. C1. G06f 03/14 Randall R. Hube
Russell W. Simpson
Jack F. Gauronski
Richard 0. Suorsa

Character code standards, such as those used by Xerox Corporation, allow computer based systems to use more than one method of encoding accented characters in a text string. For example, an accented character could be encoded as a single character code representing a combined letter and accent in one bitmap (or contour), or the accented character could be encoded as two separate character codes, one for the letter and the other for the accent. In the second case, the system renders the two codes such that they appear as one when printed or displayed by applying one over the other. A problem arises in that if workstation software specifies a selection option using one accented character rendering scheme and the printer for such workstation employs another accented character rendering scheme, or operator entered selections, the strings will not match when compared by the system.

Preferably, the invention is directed toward a method for recognizing that an inputted string composed of a non-spacing accent followed by a letter is equivalent to a string containing a singular accented character. In the recognizing method, software is provided to recognize the input to the printer as either a one or two character representation and to harmonize such input...