Browse Prior Art Database

COLOR XEROGRAPHY WITH VARIABLE GLOSS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000027257D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 114K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Color imaging with high gloss in the bright color areas and lower gloss in the black and dark areas is proposed as a means of achieving high color saturation while simultaneously minimizing the objectionable high contrast between the specular and off-specular appearance.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

COLOR XEROGRAPHY WITH Proposed Classification VARIABLE GLOSS US. C1.355/326
Edul N. Dalal
Paul C. Swanton
Sue E. Blaszak

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Int. C1. G03g 15/01

Color imaging with high gloss in the bright color areas and lower gloss in the black and dark areas is proposed as a means of achieving high color saturation while simultaneously minimizing the objectionable high contrast between the specular and off-specular appearance.

The color gamut of an imaging system is the range of colors that it can reproduce. A larger gamut means that more colors, and brighter colors, can be reproduced. The achievable color gamut of a system is dependent on its gloss, high gloss images of a given composition appearing to be brighter, i.e., more saturated. However, high gloss can be objectionable in some cases. For example, high gloss is objectionable primarily when there is a large contrast between the specular and off-specular appearance of an image. That is, the image looks very light when viewed at the specular (or mirror) angle, but looks much darker when the viewing angle is changed. Thus, black and other dark areas of an image are much more objectionable at high gloss than light or bright colored areas.

The objectionable appearance property can be overcome by creating the dark areas of the image at a lower gloss than the bright ares. One approach in a four-color xerographic system is to make the toners such that the color toners (cyan, magenta, yellow) provide a high gloss and the black toner provides a lower gloss, under specified fusing conditions. This in turn can be achieved in several ways, such as using a lower melting resin in the color toners and a higher melting resin in the black toner; or using a crosslinked resin system with a higher crosslink density or gel content in the black toner than in the colo...