Browse Prior Art Database

ORGANIC PHOTOCONDUCTOR END CAP REMOVAL METHOD

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000027264D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 92K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Disclosed is an automated method for the removal of end cap support elements from the ends of an organic photoconductor, for example, as used in dip coat manufacture of photoreceptor substrate, after the fabrication step or process is completed. In some operations, the removal of plastic end caps used in the manufacture of organic photoconductor members is accomplished by placing a rod inside the photoconductor and mechanically or physically forcing the end cap out the opposite end of the photoconductor. This process is believed to be inefficient and uneconomical particularly for high volume production schemes.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

ORGANIC PHOTOCONDUCTOR Proposed Classification END CAP REMOVAL METHOD
Loren E. Hendrix
William G. Herbert

U.S. C1.430/059 Int. C1. G03g 05/06

Disclosed is an automated method for the removal of end cap support elements from the ends of an organic photoconductor, for example, as used in dip coat manufacture of photoreceptor substrate, after the fabrication step or process is completed. In some operations, the removal of plastic end caps used in the manufacture of organic photoconductor members is accomplished by placing a rod inside the photoconductor and mechanically or physically forcing the end cap out the opposite end of the photoconductor. This process is believed to be inefficient and uneconomical particularly for high volume production schemes.

An improved method comprises placing the photoconductor drum member over a rigid rod which also simultaneously seals the opening in end cap bells at each end of the drum. From the opposite end of the photoconductor member a tube is inserted through which liquid nitrogen is injected as a spray. The liquid nitrogen sprayed inside of the photoconductor causes the photoconductor to gradually contract. Boiling of the liquid nitrogen contacting ambient conditions also creates increased pressure in the sealed end capped interior of the photoconductor. The combined action of the contracting end cap and the increase in pressure within the photoconductor leads to efficient removal of the end cap bells from the photor...