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Browse Prior Art Database

SYMMETRIC DILATION

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000027282D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Feb-29
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

As is well known optical enlargement of the printing spot in a laser printer produces a darker output print. With white write xerography like that used in the Xerox 4235 the optical spot cannot be sufficiently enlarged to provide printer outputs as dark as desired. Asymmetric dilation has been used to increase the darkness of symmetrical optical spots without enlarging the optical spot. While producing a darker spot, asymmetrical dilation also produces undesired tints and halftones.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

SYMMETRIC DILATION Proposed Louis D. Mailloux Classification

U.S. C1.355/052

Int. C1. G03b 27/68

FIG. I

FIG. 2

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 21, No. 1 January/February 1996 35

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SYMMETRIC DILATION(Cont'd)

As is well known optical enlargement of the printing spot in a laser printer produces a darker output print. With white write xerography like that used in
the Xerox 4235 the optical spot cannot be sufficiently enlarged to provide printer outputs as dark as desired. Asymmetric dilation has been used to increase the darkness of symmetrical optical spots without enlarging the optical spot. While producing a darker spot, asymmetrical dilation also produces undesired tints and halftones.

Symmetric dilation allows a white write printer to produce an output as dark as that of a write black printer without producing undesired tints and halftones. Symmetrical dilation uses electronic mimicry of optical systems to reduce tints and halftones.

Figure 1 illustrates asymmetrical dilation of an optical spot.

Figure 2 illustrates symmetrical dilation of an optical spot as applied a high addressability printer.

36 XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 21, No. 1 January/February 1996

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