Browse Prior Art Database

COLOR PRINTING SYSTEM EMPLOYING NON-INTERACTIVE DEVELOPMENT

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000027296D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Feb-29
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-07
Document File: 6 page(s) / 286K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

This disclosure relates to electronic copying/printing systems and more particularly to an electronic multi-color copying/printing system that employs non-interactive development. In typical xerographic type color copiers, processing of the color copies is done in sequence. For example, in one well known commercial copier, a blue color separation image is first made, developed with yellow toner, and transferred to a copy sheet which is supported on a rotating drum synchronized to the copying process. Then, a second green color separation image is made, developed with magenta toner, and transferred to the copy sheet in superimposed registered relationship with the first color separation image. Lastly, a third red color separation image is made, developed with cyan toner, and transferred to the copy sheet in superimposed registered relationship with the previously transferred blue and green color separation images. The resulting combination of color separation images is thereafter fused to provide a permanent color copy.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

COLOR PRINTING SYSTEM Proposed Classification EMPLOYING NON-INTERACTIVE U.S. C1.355/326R DEVELOPMENT Int. C1. G03g 15/01 Christopher Snelling
Richard F. Bergen
Robert W. Gundlach
Dale R Mashtare

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FIG. I

215

FIG. 2

FIG. 3

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 21, No. 1 January/February 1996 67

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COLOR PRINTING SYSTEM EMPLOYING NON-INTERACTIVE DEVELOPMENT(Cont'd)

FIG. 4

68 XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 21, No. 1 JanuaryEebruary 1996

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COLOR PRINTING SYSTEM EMPLOYING NON-INTERACTIVE DEVELOPMENT( Cont'd)

This disclosure relates to electronic copying/printing systems and more particularly to an electronic multi-color copying/printing system that employs non-interactive development.

In typical xerographic type color copiers, processing of the color copies is done in sequence. For example, in one well known commercial copier, a blue color separation image is first made, developed with yellow toner, and transferred to a copy sheet which is supported on a rotating drum synchronized to the copying process. Then, a second green color separation image is made, developed with magenta toner, and transferred to the copy sheet in superimposed registered relationship with the first color separation image. Lastly, a third red color separation image is made, developed with cyan toner, and transferred to the copy sheet in superimposed registered relationship with the previously transferred blue and green color separation images. The resulting combination of color separation images is thereafter fused to provide a permanent color copy.

As can be appreciated from the above discussion, the color copying process described is relatively slow, requiring approximately three times as much time to process one copy as is required to process a black and white copy. Additionally, great care must be taken to assure exact registration of the several color separation images with one another if a clear and exact copy of the color original is to be made.

Turning now to FIG. 1 and the present invention, an enlarged development apparatus 200 is shown that accomplishes stretch toner release in a non-
interactive development process having minimal interactive effects between deposited (developed) toner and subsequently presented toner. The development apparatus 200 is a means to achieve multicolor single transfer systems without cross-color contamination of images and/or developer materials (scavenging effects). The development apparatus 200 is typical of developing apparatuses of the present invention and comprises a flexible belt 205 as a donor member having a portion thereof closely spaced with respect to photoreceptor 20 in what is commonly known as touchdown development. The belt 205 is entrained around spaced roller 210 and stretch member 215. Roller 210 is the driver and is positioned adjacent a magn...