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CUSTOM COLOR LIQUID INK DEVELOPMENT (LID) PROCESS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000027335D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Apr-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 72K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Disclosed is a custom color liquid ink development (LID) process wherein two or more liquid colored inks are used, in proper predetermined relative amounts, to provide custom or customer specified color images. Two or more individual inks are applied simultaneously to the image receiving element, for example, a photoreceptor, by separate applicators prior to passing through a single development/metering station. The process may be accomplished using a cyclic architecture in which one of a set of multiple ink applicators is used to flood the image receiving element with ink in each pass prior to being developed by a single development/metering station. Thus, a multi-colored image can be built up on either the image receiving element, on an intermediate belt or drum, or on receiver sheet, such as paper. A similar architecture is used, for example, in the Indigo E-Print 1000, in which specialty colors formed from combinations of the base inks are delivered to the image receiving element from a fifth and/or sixth sump and applicator.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

CUSTOM COLOR LIQUID INK

DEVELOPMENT (LID) PROCESS

Nancy B. Goodman

Proposed Classification

U.S. C1.355/256 Int. C1. G03g 15/10

Disclosed is a custom color liquid ink development (LID) process wherein two or more liquid colored inks are used, in proper predetermined relative amounts, to provide custom or customer specified color images. Two or more individual inks are applied simultaneously to the image receiving element, for example, a photoreceptor, by separate applicators prior to passing through a single development/metering station. The process may be accomplished using a cyclic architecture in which one of a set of multiple ink applicators is used to flood the image receiving element with ink in each pass prior to being developed by a single development/metering station. Thus, a multi-colored image can be built up on either the image receiving element, on an intermediate belt or drum, or on receiver sheet, such as paper. A similar architecture is used, for example, in the Indigo E-Print 1000, in which specialty colors formed from combinations of the base inks are delivered to the image receiving element from a fifth and/or sixth sump and applicator.

Thus, these custom color printing processes retain the advantage of printing a new color on a single latent image to achieve perfect registration of the component inks, while removing the necessity for an extra sump, applicator and ink handling system for the blended inks. One need only a...