Browse Prior Art Database

VACUUM ROLL DRIVE FOR LID MARKING

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000027336D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Apr-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 65K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Disclosed is a porous, partially evacuated drive roll to improve belt drive performance in liquid ink development (LID) marking systems. Surfaces within LID marking modules are usually wet with dispersant liquid, so dispersant films often form on the backs of photoreceptor and other process belts. Occasionally, this occurs despite the design intent, and occasionally such films are advantageous as boundary layer lubricants to aid belt motion. However, such films can interfere with the operation of drive rolls which may slip against them.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

VACUUM ROLL DRIVE FOR LID Proposed Classification MARKING US. C1.355/256 Richard B, Lewis Int. C1. G03g 05/10

Disclosed is a porous, partially evacuated drive roll to improve belt drive performance in liquid ink development (LID) marking systems.

Surfaces within LID marking modules are usually wet with dispersant liquid, so dispersant films often form on the backs of photoreceptor and other process belts. Occasionally, this occurs despite the design intent, and occasionally such films are advantageous as boundary layer lubricants to aid belt motion. However, such films can interfere with the operation of drive rolls which may slip against them.

The porous drive rolls provide partial vacuum within their interiors. Pore size and vacuum should preferably be comparable to a first conditioning blotter roll so the arrangement is below the bubble pressure. Bubble pressure is the pressure difference across a liquid-containing porous membrane below which the surface tension of liquid prevents entry of air into the membrane. Bubble pressure is well known in filtration technology, and depends on surface energies and increases as pore size is reduced. Preferably, the rolls are constructed of a rigid material, for example, sintered metal. In operation, a wetted belt back surface coming into contact with a roll would be pumped dry
of liquid dispersant with the belt temporarily clamped to the roll surface by the vacuum supplied to the roll interior. In...