Browse Prior Art Database

AEROSOL CLEANING OF PHOTORECEPTOR SUBSTRATE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000027349D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Jun-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 66K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Photoreceptor substrate cleaning is a critical step in the mandacturing process. Proposed is the use of high speed fine aerosol jet to clean the substrate. The aerosol can then be generated by mixing in a chamber a hot stream of inert gas saturated with chemical vapor and a cold stream of the inert gas. The aerosol can then be pushed through a slit nozzle to form a high speed stream and impinge onto the substrate for cleaning.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

AEROSOL CLEANING OF PHOTORECEPTOR SUBSTRATE Huoy-Jen Yuh
John S. Chambers
Rachael Forgit
Ronald E. Godlove
Robert E. McCumiskey
Kamran u. zaman

Proposed Classification
U. S. C1.134/007 ht. C1. B08b 07/00

Photoreceptor substrate cleaning is a critical step in the mandacturing process. Proposed is the use of high speed fine aerosol jet to clean the substrate. The aerosol can then be generated by mixing in a chamber a hot stream of inert gas saturated with chemical vapor and a cold stream of the inert gas. The aerosol can then be pushed through a slit nozzle to form a high speed stream and impinge onto the substrate for cleaning.

The substrate can be moved with a feed through and linearly transfixred under the jet stream. The chemicals can be any non-reactive, low boiling, high vapor solvent, such as
methanol. The inert gas can be nitrogen, argon, and the like gases. It is preferable to have a pressure difference between the aerosol chamber and the environment where the substrate is so the jet can be expanded with good speed. The inert gas and chemical vapor should be filtered prior to entering the chamber. Similar techniques have shown some promise in the silicon wafer cleaning area. It is believed that submicron particulate and

thin film contaminants can be removed efficiently with this method without any damage to the substrate surface. The cleaning efficiency depends on the jet speed, the distance between substrate and nozzle and the sub...