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Browse Prior Art Database

COLOR INK JET FOR FABRIC PRINTING

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000027401D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Oct-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 98K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Disclosed is a system (hardware, software and ink) to allow highly cost effective printing/ dying of fabrics in very short runs with unparalleled color gamut. Wide format ink jet technology enables cost effective short run printing while Hi-Fi color software and ink set enables very wide color gamut.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

COLOR INK JET FOR FABRIC PRINTING

Proposed Classification Diane M. Foley U. S. C1. 346/140

Int. C1. Gold 15/16

Disclosed is a system (hardware, software and ink) to allow highly cost effective printing/ dying of fabrics in very short runs with unparalleled color gamut. Wide format ink jet technology enables cost effective short run printing while Hi-Fi color software and ink set enables very wide color gamut.

The problem addressed herein is the need for an economical method of printing short runs on textiles in a wide variety of colors and patterns. Direct ink jet printing on textiles has been proposed. The focus of this work is on replacement of existing textile dying and printing processes in large scale production and has been held back by the relatively slow production speeds. This focus overlooks the advantages of the ink jet technology for economical short run production. In business communication and graphic arts, ink jet is becoming more valued as a means of obtaining high quality color printing but the four color process inks offer too limited a range for textile work where the ability to offer, for example, seasonal specialty colors not accessible by four color mixing is a competitive advantage for a fabric merchant. High fidelity color, that is, the use of, for example, 6 to 8 process colors, is known in offset lithographic printing to offer a greatly expanded set of achievable colors.

In addition to the increased ink set, Hi-Fi color requires specialized software, increased computer processing capability and 2 to 4 additional printing stations. Each printing station on a press can cost $250,000. The economics of Hi-Fi color compared to offse...