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COMPLEMENTARY DISSIMILARITY: A SECOND GENERATION INK DESIGN

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000027402D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Oct-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 115K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Disclosed is the use of specific classes of polyelectrolyte complexes in ink jet inks. These complexes enable the design of stable particulate inks by making use of the fact that compatibility between a first stabilizer and the ink cosolvent composition is enhanced with the use of a second or co-stabilizer, which is complementary to the first stabilizer.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

COMPLEMENTARY DISSIMILARITY: Proposed Classification A SECOND GENERATION INK DESIGN
Barkev Keoshkerian
Marcel P. Breton
Fatima M. Pontes
Carol A. Jennings
Yvan Gagnon
Raymond W. Wong

U. S. C1. 346/140 Int. C1. Gold 15/16

Disclosed is the use of specific classes of polyelectrolyte complexes in ink jet inks. These complexes enable the design of stable particulate inks by making use of the fact that compatibility between a first stabilizer and the ink cosolvent composition is enhanced with the use of a second or co-stabilizer, which is complementary to the first stabilizer.

The concept of complementary dissimilarity was first introduced by 0. Olabisi (Macromolecules 316) as a way of enhancing the miscibility of polymer blends.

It is proposed to design particulate and dye based inks which take advantage of the strong or weak interactions that may exist between electrolytes. For example, a particulate ink
may be stabilized by coating the particles used in the ink with a weak or strong polyelectrolyte complex. One of the advantages of strong polyelectrolyte complexes resides in the fact that these complexes can sorb considerable amounts of water and possess properties typical of hydrogels. A second advantage resides in that the electrolytes can be selected to be insoluble in water, acids, bases, and organic solvents, but soluble in mixtures of water, polar organic solvents and electrolytes. Solubility may also be a consequence of the use of ternary solvent systems. Hydrogel-like properties will result in improvement in latency and selected solubility may be used as a way to design waterfast inks.

Many polyelectrolytes complexes may be used to enhance ink properties, several examples follow:

1) a complex of gelatin and gum arabic;

2) a polyethylene complex with sodium dextran sulfate;

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 21, No. 5 SeptembedOctober 1996 305

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COMPLEMENTARY DISSIMILARRY A SECOND GENERATION INK...