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Browse Prior Art Database

IMPROVED FINISHER CAPACITY RANGE CHECKING

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000027412D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Oct-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 73K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Proposed is a method for improving the accuracy of finisher capacity range checks in an electrophotographic printing machine. The method determines the theoretical set thickness based on the cumulative thickness of individual sheets in a print set. The theoretical set thickness is the sum of the sheet thickness of each sheet in the set, plus any factors that account for set fluff or image build-up. Sheet thickness may be inferred from the paper basis weight, or it can be entered directly by an operator, as a stock attribute.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

IMPROVED FINISHER CAPACITY RANGE CHECKING U. S. C1.355/311 Michael E. Farrell

Proposed Classification

Int. Cl. G03g 21/00

Proposed is a method for improving the accuracy of finisher capacity range checks in an electrophotographic printing machine. The method determines the theoretical set thickness based on the cumulative thickness of individual sheets in a print set. The theoretical set thickness is the sum of the sheet thickness of each sheet in the set, plus any factors that account for set fluff or image build-up. Sheet thickness may be inferred from the paper basis weight, or it can be entered directly by an operator, as a stock attribute.

The frnisher capacity range check is performed to ensure that a programmed job falls within the set thickness operating range of the finishing device. Improving the range check accuracy offers several benefits:

1) Fewer jams caused by overfilling collating stations when thicker than nominal sheets are included in the set.

2) Greater machine productivity by eliminating the need to remake jammed or poorly finished sets. A set with a poorlyclinched stitch is an example of a poorly finished set.

3) Improved operator productivity. The operator can be alerted to finishing capacity conflicts while programming the job, thereby speeding up the process of correcting the conflict.

4) Increased finishing capacity when thinner than nominal sheets are in the set.

Current high and mid-volume printers perform rang...