Browse Prior Art Database

LOW END FRICTION CLEANING BLADE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000027486D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Apr-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 125K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Disclosed are methods of producing a xerographic process cleaning blade characterized by a lowered coefficient of friction and adhesion at the end zones of the blade. This type of blade provides a solution to problems which frequently confronts a designer of cleaning blades:

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 54% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

LOW END FRICTION CLEANING BLADE

Proposed Classlfication Ronald E. Godlove U. S. C1. 399/101

Int. C1. G03g 21/00

Disclosed are methods of producing a xerographic process cleaning blade characterized by a lowered coefficient of friction and adhesion at the end zones of the blade. This type of blade provides a solution to problems which frequently confronts a designer of cleaning blades:

1. If the blade is made long enough to guarantee that residual toner accumulation will not "plow" past the ends of the blade, then under ordinary conditions the ends of the blade will not be sufficiently lubricated by toner. Under this condition, excessive friction and adhesion will cause the ends of the blade to prematurely wear, fold over (if a doctor mode blade), and vibrate to an extent as to cause audible squealing tones. None of those effects begin desirable, it is moot to do something to the ends of the blade to lessen the friction and adhesion even under the condition of insufficient lubricating toner. Tuck induced wear has been observed to spread from the site of the initial appearance, and even though good cleaning performance is not required of the very ends of the blade, wear appearing there can lead to the premature failure of the blade as a whole. Vibrations of these regions of the blade are acoustically coupled to the more inner regions of the blade, also possibly leading to premature blade failure. Of course, doctor blade foldover usually results in the instantaneous and total destruction of not only the entire blade cleaning area, but often results in delamination and other damage to the photoreceptor as well.

2. If the blade is designed to be so short that the ends of the blade are always supplied with a sufficient amount of lubricating toner, then eventually enough residual toner can build up so as to begin to "plow" around the ends of the blade, resulting in a many layer thick track of toner on both inboard and outboard regions of the photoreceptor along the locations engaging the ends of the blade. This can result in all sorts of copy quality spoiling spots, and contamination by large amounts of toner on other sub-systems.

A way...