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MANUFACTURING PROCESS FOR RESURFACING PHENOLIC DONOR ROLLS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000027489D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Apr-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 56K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

In the process for manufacturing or resurfacing donor rolls for use in xerographic development units, a phenolic surface of the donor roll is developed with a certain roughness characteristic to maximize toner-conveyance performance. Generally, this roughness can be obtained by a dry grit blast operation, but this is found to generate too much heat and partially melt the phenolic surface, producing a galled surface which leaves a significant low frequency component of the surface roughness. A wet grit blast process also produces inconsistent levels of this galled quality.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

MANUFACTURING PROCESS FOR Proposed Classification RESURFACING PHENOLIC DONOR ROLLS
Gregory V. Bogoshian
Raphael F. Bov, Jr.

Holly M. Williamson

U. S. C1. 3991265 Int. C1. G03g 15/06

In the process for manufacturing or resurfacing donor rolls for use in xerographic development units, a phenolic surface of the donor roll is developed with a certain roughness characteristic to maximize toner-conveyance performance. Generally, this roughness can be obtained by a dry grit blast operation, but this is found to generate too much heat and partially melt the phenolic surface, producing a galled surface which leaves a significant low frequency component of the surface roughness. A wet grit blast process also produces inconsistent levels of this galled quality.

An improved technique for obtaining the desired roughness characteristics of the donor roll includes pre-chilling the donor roll by refrigeration or any other appropriate method, and also chill a liquid grit carrier to allow penetration of the grit and quickly remove heat from the working surface. This chilling prevents localized melting of the surface which induces a low frequency component to the surface roughness.

DP5555

XEROX DISCLSOURE JOURNAL - Vol. 22, NO. 2 March/ApriI 1997 99

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100 XEROX DISCLSOURE JOURNAL - Vol. 22, No. 2 MarcldAprill997

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