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MODIFICATION OF INK JET MEDIA TO IMPROVE PRINT QUALITY

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000027566D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 171K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Printed documents made by the ink jet process are produced by the controlled placement of ink drops onto paper, film, and similar materials collectively referred to as media. The drops of ink are absorbed onto and into the surface of the medium to form the image.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

MODIFICATION OF INK JET MEDIA TO IMPROVE PRINT QUALITY
Richard G. Weller

Proposed Classification
U. S. C1. 106/020R Int. C1. C09d 11/00

Printed documents made by the ink jet process are produced by the controlled placement of ink drops onto paper, film, and similar materials collectively referred to as media. The drops of ink are absorbed onto and into the surface of the medium to form the image.

Ink absorption into a medium occurs by the liquid ink flowing into the pores and capillaries of the medium's bulk and the surfaces upon which the images are printed. The surfaces of printing media (such as paper and transparency films) are often modified to improve the quality of the printed image. Common methods of modification include addition of a coating to one or more of the surfaces to be printed by ink jet. These coatings typically are made of water absorbing polymer materials such as gelatin, polyvinyl alcohol, cellulose derivatives, and the like. Coatings applied to paper also often include pigments to increase the void and capillary volume for holding the liquid ink, which makes the paper feel and act dry even though the ink is still in liquid form immediately after printing. Drops applied to such surfaces tend to be absorbed somewhat equally in all
directions, both into the coating and also in all directions on the surface of the coating. For high quality printing, however, equal absorption of the drops in all directions may not be desirable. For example, for best print density, it may be desirable to keep the ink from penetrating too deeply into the coating, which can be accomplished by reducing the amount of pigment and increasing the amount of polymer. In other situations, it may be desirable to soak up the ink very fast to keep the printed image from being too wet and offsetting to other contacting surfaces, which can be accomplished by increasing the amount of pigment and reducing the amount of polymer.

Disclosed herein are methods for producing improved control of ink penetration and spreading on a medium, wherein the requirements are more complex than those mentioned above. For example, the following objectives can be achieved:

1. Reduction of lateral spreading without impeding penetration into the absorptive part of the coating, thereby reducing dot size of the printed spots and enabling printing of high resolution images.

2.

ink of drops small of coalescence the of Prevention result in undesirable image effects as a result of nonuniform appearance. into puddles, which could

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 22, No. 6 NovemberlDecember 1997 213

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MODIFICATION OF INK JET MEDIA TO IMPROVE PRINT QUALITY (CONT'D)

3. Increasing the spreading of ink dots to cover unprinted areas between dots by improving the ease of wettability of the medium surface. (This objective can be accomplished by the application of a thin layer of surfactant to t...