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STOCK-IMAGE VERIFICATION

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000027580D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 115K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Since xerographic or other copiers or printers typically have several different paper trays in which different sizes, weights, colors, or other characteristics of paper stock may be loaded, there can be as many as six such paper trays. Thus, there exists the possibility of operator error, causing a print job or portions of a print job, to be printed on the wrong stock. This can happen by loading the wrong stock in a tray programmed for another stock, or by selecting the wrong tray for the job in setting up the job on the machine graphic user interface or job ticket. If the wrong stock was a special preprinted stock, and there was a large nm, this mistake can be economically wasteful as well as time-consuming.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

STOCK-IMAGE VERIFICATION

Robert L. Schutt James R. York

Proposed Classification
U. S. C1.399/075 Int. C1. G03b 15/00

Since xerographic or other copiers or printers typically have several different paper trays in which different sizes, weights, colors, or other characteristics of paper stock may be loaded, there can be as many as six such paper trays. Thus, there exists the possibility of operator error, causing a print job or portions of a print job, to be printed on the wrong stock. This can happen by loading the wrong stock in a tray programmed for another stock, or by selecting the wrong tray for the job in setting up the job on the machine graphic user interface or job ticket. If the wrong stock was a special preprinted stock, and there was a large nm, this mistake can be economically wasteful as well as time- consuming.

It is suggested to provide identification for the particular stock in the form of a "glyph" providing the stock information on the preprinted stock. The glyph can be invisible (see references cited below) especially if integrated into the preprinted text or graphics. The glyph can provide a specific and unique identification of each of the different special user preprinted stock types. During the printing, a glyph code reader can be positioned in the path of the sheet as it is fed to be printed, to look for such a glyph code, and, if one is found, the unique number thereon can be compared to the desired job to determine if there is a stock type mismatch. In that case, the machine can automatically be cycled on to save waste of valuable preprinted stock.

The stock validation software can be in the data glyph reader itself rather than in the main controller or IOT of the printer.

Examples of such special preprinted stock include paychecks, telephone bills, credit card statements, and contracts. Special paper stock may also have preprinted color areas, prepunched holes, tabs, glue areas, multi-part (multi-sheet carbonless paper) forms, etc.

Manual inspe...