Browse Prior Art Database

ENVELOPE INSERTER FOR FAX MACHINES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000027587D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Feb-28
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 65K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

In most business environments the fax machine is a shared resource. The majority of faxes contain a cover page which indicates whom should receive the fax, followed by the faxed document. As a shared resource, retrieving a fax frequently entails searching through faxes for other people to locate the fax sought. This method involves a loss of privacy in receiving information via fax due to the number of people with access to the faxed documents.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

ENVELOPE INSERTER FOR FAX MACHINES
Eric S. Redleaf

Proposed Classification
U. S. C1.3581259 Int. C1. H04n 1/06

In most business environments the fax machine is a shared resource. The majority of faxes contain a cover page which indicates whom should receive the fax, followed by the faxed document. As a shared resource, retrieving a fax frequently entails searching through faxes for other people to locate the fax sought. This method involves a loss of privacy in
receiving information via fax due to the number of people with access to the faxed documents.

To enhance efficiency and confidentiality, the first page (e.g. the cover page) of an incoming fax is printed on an envelope and subsequent pages of the same transmission are then inserted into this envelope. The envelope is then sealed, containing the transmitted document therein, and delivered to a catch tray. Efficiency is enhanced due to a single envelope (or a reduced number of envelopes if a large transmission is received) being delivered to the catch tray rather than separate sheets that can be easily misplaced. Additionally, it is quicker to page through fewer envelopes than separate single sheets to locate a fax. Confidentiality is enhanced by the sealing of the envelopes upon completion of the transmission so that others can not read the fax.

Non-plain paper fax machines could be equipped to insert documents into a windowed envelope with only the cover page showing.

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