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ULTRAVIOLET LASER CUT AND SCULPTURE PROCESS FOR MANUFACTURE OF COMMUTATION BRUSHES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000027665D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Aug-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 63K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Disclosed is a cost effective and reliable method to enable mass production of the unique features of the fiber rich, working contact surface of commutation brushes. A key element to this process involves beam shaping and raster scanning of a high spectral frequency laser to perform a critical cut and sculpture operation. This disclosure describes the critical details of a laser process that is unique to this application.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

ULTRAVIOLET LASER CUT AND SCULPTURE PROCESS FOR MANUFACTURE OF COMMUTATION BRUSHES
Joseph A. Swift
John R. Andrews
William J. Greene

Proposed Classification
U. S. C1. 399/222 Int. C1. G03g 15/06

Disclosed is a cost effective and reliable method to enable mass production of the unique features of the fiber rich, working contact surface of commutation brushes. A key element to this process involves beam shaping and raster scanning of a high spectral frequency laser to perform a critical cut and sculpture operation. This disclosure describes the critical details of a laser process that is unique to this application.

Laser cutting of the conductive fibers can be performed using a spot cut where a simple focused laser beam is used and the part is translated to execute the cut. This is the method that has been used to demonstrate cutting without change to the fibers' resistance. An ideal manufacturing uses a line focused beam employing a cylinder lens to focus an eximer beam into a line configuration that spans the full width of the carbon fiber brush. This geometry is preferred in large scale manufacturing because it allows a single positioning operation to cut the entire contact surface. Further, this beam geometry permits a miter cut at any angle relative to the long axis of the fibers. A curved contact surface can also be generated simply by, during the cutting process, effecting a translation or rotation of the contact to sculpt the desire...